Cover image for Introspections : American poets on one of their own poems
Title:
Introspections : American poets on one of their own poems
Author:
Pack, Robert, 1929-
Publication Information:
[Middlebury, Vt.] : Middlebury College Press ; Hanover, NH : University Press of New England, 1997.
Physical Description:
vii, 329 pages ; 23 cm
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780874517736

9780874517729
Format :
Book

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PS325 .I58 1997 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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Summary

Summary

Fifty-five essays by major American poets reflecting on their own work.


Reviews 1

Choice Review

Introspections is a better buy than its companion volume, Touchstones, also ed. by Pack and Parini (CH, Jun'96). In the latter, some 20 American poets write about a favorite poem written by someone else, but the editors do not include the texts. A gyp. In Introspections, poets (mostly the same ones) each discuss a poem of their own, text included. Some of these essays are valuable and interesting, notably those of the editors; others seem to be lame apologies for mediocre work. Finally, though, this reviewer sensed a certain sameness about most of the essays, most of the poets. One misses experimenters, ethnic poets, feminists. Where is the poetry of witness and commitment? The book's very format--poets talking about their own work--is partial to one view of poetry, i.e., that it is intimate personal expression and nothing more. This book promotes a harmless kind of poetry, written by the mildly eccentric out of obscure private discomforts they hope to make interesting to the reader by explaining them. The poet's personality, such as it is, is more important than the poem. Sad. Though accessible to all, recommended only for comprehensive collections. J. D. McGowan; Illinois Wesleyan University