Cover image for Rikki-tikki-tavi
Title:
Rikki-tikki-tavi
Author:
Pinkney, Jerry.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Morrow Junior Books, [1997]

©1997
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 29 cm
Summary:
A courageous mongoose thwarts the evil plans of Nag and Nagaina, two big black cobras who live in the garden.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
AD 810 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 4.4 1.0 55715.

Reading Counts RC 3-5 6.4 3 Quiz: 13610.
Geographic Term:
ISBN:
9780688143206

9780688143213
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Item Holds
Searching...
X Juvenile Fiction Open Shelf
Searching...
Searching...
X Juvenile Fiction Open Shelf
Searching...
Searching...
X Juvenile Fiction Fairy Tales
Searching...
Searching...
X Juvenile Fiction Central Closed Stacks
Searching...
Searching...
X Juvenile Fiction Central Closed Stacks
Searching...
Searching...
X Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
Searching...
Searching...
X Juvenile Fiction Fairy Tales
Searching...
Searching...
X Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
Searching...
Searching...
X Juvenile Fiction Open Shelf
Searching...
Searching...
X Juvenile Fiction Open Shelf
Searching...

On Order

Summary

Summary

Here is the thrilling story of Rikki, a fearless young mongoose who finds himself locked in a life-and-death struggle to protect a boy and his parents from Nag and Nagaina, the two enormous cobras who stalk the gardens outside the familys home in India. Nobel Prize winner Rudyard Kiplings timeless masterpiece has been lovingly passed from one generation of readers to the next. Triumphantly brought to life in stunning watercolors from Caldecott Honor artist Jerry Pinkney, this is a tale that will win the hearts of young and old alike


Author Notes

Kipling, who as a novelist dramatized the ambivalence of the British colonial experience, was born of English parents in Bombay and as a child knew Hindustani better than English. He spent an unhappy period of exile from his parents (and the Indian heat) with a harsh aunt in England, followed by the public schooling that inspired his "Stalky" stories. He returned to India at 18 to work on the staff of the Lahore Civil and Military Gazette and rapidly became a prolific writer. His mildly satirical work won him a reputation in England, and he returned there in 1889. Shortly after, his first novel, The Light That Failed (1890) was published, but it was not altogether successful.

In the early 1890s, Kipling met and married Caroline Balestier and moved with her to her family's estate in Brattleboro, Vermont. While there he wrote Many Inventions (1893), The Jungle Book (1894-95), and Captains Courageous (1897). He became dissatisfied with life in America, however, and moved back to England, returning to America only when his daughter died of pneumonia. Kipling never again returned to the United States, despite his great popularity there.

Short stories form the greater portion of Kipling's work and are of several distinct types. Some of his best are stories of the supernatural, the eerie and unearthly, such as "The Phantom Rickshaw," "The Brushwood Boy," and "They." His tales of gruesome horror include "The Mark of the Beast" and "The Return of Imray." "William the Conqueror" and "The Head of the District" are among his political tales of English rule in India. The "Soldiers Three" group deals with Kipling's three musketeers: an Irishman, a Cockney, and a Yorkshireman. The Anglo-Indian Tales, of social life in Simla, make up the larger part of his first four books.

Kipling wrote equally well for children and adults. His best-known children's books are Just So Stories (1902), The Jungle Books (1894-95), and Kim (1901). His short stories, although their understanding of the Indian is often moving, became minor hymns to the glory of Queen Victoria's empire and the civil servants and soldiers who staffed her outposts. Kim, an Irish boy in India who becomes the companion of a Tibetan lama, at length joins the British Secret Service, without, says Wilson, any sense of the betrayal of his friend this actually meant. Nevertheless, Kipling has left a vivid panorama of the India of his day.

In 1907, Kipling became England's first Nobel Prize winner in literature and the only nineteenth-century English poet to win the Prize. He won not only on the basis of his short stories, which more closely mirror the ambiguities of the declining Edwardian world than has commonly been recognized, but also on the basis of his tremendous ability as a popular poet. His reputation was first made with Barrack Room Ballads (1892), and in "Recessional" he captured a side of Queen Victoria's final jubilee that no one else dared to address.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

Gr. 3^-5, younger for reading aloud. In Kipling's classic story, the brave young mongoose, Rikki-tikki-tavi, proves his worth through his courage and audacity. Saved from near drowning and exposure by an English family living in India, Rikki-tikki repays their kindness with his brave actions. In the family's garden live the evil cobras Nag and Nagaina and a smaller but equally dangerous snake. Each of the snakes tries to bite the little English boy or his parents, but a formidable Rikki-tikki attacks and kills the snakes. Dramatic in content, sensitive in line, and rich with color, the illustrations in this picture book make full use of the broad, double-page spreads. Children who are not familiar with the story will be captivated; those who have had the story read to them before will find new things to shiver over. In an author's note, Pinkney explains how he came to illustrate the story, which had resonance for him as a child. A beautiful edition for reading aloud. --Carolyn Phelan


Publisher's Weekly Review

With this newly illustrated edition of the treasured classic--written in the 1890s as part of the Jungle Books --readers can once again be captivated by the tale of a mongoose who is taken in by a family of British colonials living in India. Although a few Victorianisms in the text will need to be explained to young readers, the story has held up remarkably well over a century's time. Rikki's fight to defend his family from the menacing cobras Nag and Nagaina remains as suspenseful and emotive as ever. The creatures of the Indian garden come truly alive in Kipling's expert prose--the birds sing out messages of joy and warning; the cobra rears and spreads his sinister hood; the brave mongoose leaps and springs, victorious at last. In Davis's ( The Jolly Mon ; Trouble Dolls ) acrylic paintings, dominated by the greens of the garden and the browns of the earth, readers can clearly see the nut-colored mongoose, his adoptive family in their period dress and the slithering snakes. However, the artist's style and chosen medium produce a somewhat flat, torpid appearance. Razor-sharp writing with rather dull artistic accompaniment. Ages 6-up. (Sept.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

Gr 2-4-- One of the most beloved of Kipling's tales, Rikki-Tikki-Tavi tells how a young mongoose outwits the deadly snakes that menace his new family. The epic narrative style accords near-heroic status to Rikki, and he is anthropomorphized enough to be lovable without falling prey to Disneyish cuteness. The humans see him as loyal, clever, fearless, and persistent; but readers will understand that his exploits result from his instincts and nature (and luck) as much as from his ``character.'' Davis's acrylic paintings, on every facing page, depict a suitable 1890s Indian bungalow setting. But the palette is heavy on boring tan, lime, and puce, and the perspective is sometimes awkward; Rikki seems to change size from page to page; and the stiff poses and smooth forms of humans and animals make them look more stuffed than alive. Sadly, this is a so-so edition of a ``Just So'' story. --Patricia Dooley, University of Washington, Seattle (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.