Cover image for Come the spring
Title:
Come the spring
Author:
Garwood, Julie.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Pocket Books, [1997]

©1997
Physical Description:
353 pages ; 25 cm
Language:
English
Personal Subject:
Subject Term:
Geographic Term:
ISBN:
9780671003333
Format :
Book

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Summary

Summary

Julie Garwood's stunning New York Times bestseller For the Roses has become a phenomenon: the much loved tale of the Claybornes of Blue Belle, Montana, inspired a trio of delightful novellas, and a Hallmark Hall of Fame movie, Rose Hill. In Come the Spring, the Clayborne legend continues -- as Julie Garwood weaves together their magnificent tale with a touching new love story. Adam, Douglas and Travis Clayborne are each happily married, and their beloved Mama Rose is overjoyed with the wonderful ladies who have joined the family. But all the Claybornes wonder on which side of the law their restless brother Cole will land. Now, Julie Garwood brings her irresistable mix of heartwarming wit and thrilling sensuality to a memorable Clayborne reunion...and at last we meet the elusive stranger who has slipped in and out of their lives, a man who lured Cole Clayborne into a shadowy chase, and who will now bring unexpected turns to Cole's uncertain future. Daniel Ryan is a hard man set on vengeance, a U.S. marshal driven by tragic, heartbreaking loss from the past. His quest leads him to a beautiful young woman, the sole witness to a terrible crime -- and the only person who can help him. But the lawman finds that love is perhaps the greatest risk of all as he unwittingly draws her into the line of fire. The power and drama of their blossoming passion, entwined with the spirited adventures of the Claybornes and the surprising choices of the wayward Cole, make Come the Spring as poignant as it is unforgettable. In the wonderful storytelling tradition of all her acclaimed Clayborne tales, Julie Garwood brings to life "a family whose love and loyalty will truly inspire" (Romantic Times). Come the Spring confirms once more why she "attracts readers like beautiful heroines attract dashing heroes" (USA Today).


Author Notes

Julie Garwood was born in Kansas City, Missouri in 1946. Her writing career began when the last of her three children entered school. Her first novel, Gentle Warrior, was published in 1985. She has written over 25 romance novels since then including Shadow Dance, Slow Burn, Murder List, Killjoy, Mercy, Heartbreaker, Ransom, Come the Spring, The Ideal Man, Sweet Talk, Hotshot, and Fast Track. Her novel For the Roses was adapted into a Hallmark Hall of Fame movie. She also wrote a children's book, What's a Girl to Do?, and has also begun writing a novel for young adults under the pseudonym of Emily Chase.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

Top romance writer Garwood's Clayborne saga, which began with For the Roses (1995), continues in this suspenseful tale in which Cole Clayborne reluctantly pins on a U.S. marshal's badge to help track down the bank-robbing Blackwater gang. Only one witness survived, but she refuses to reveal her identity, and Cole and the sheriff have trouble concentrating on the investigation as they try to determine which of three lovely ladies is the key to their case.


Library Journal Review

Wondering what happened to the Claybournes, who hit the best sellers list in three separate titles this summer after making a splash with a television movie broadcast last April? Wonder no more. Garwood wraps up their story in this handy conclusion. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Excerpts

Excerpts

from Chapter One But for the grace of God and an untied shoelace, she would have died with the others that day. She walked into the bank at precisely two forty-five in the afternoon to close her account, deliberately leaving the task until the last possible minute because it made everything so final in her mind. There would be no going back. All of her possessions had been packed, and very soon now she would be leaving Rockford Falls, Montana, forever. Sherman MacCorkle, the bank president, would lock the doors in fifteen minutes. The lobby was filled with other procrastinators like herself, yet for all the customers, there were only two tellers working the windows instead of the usual three. Emmeline MacCorkle, Sherman's daughter, was apparently still at home recovering from the influenza that had swept through the peaceful little town two weeks before. Malcolm Watterson's line was shorter by three heads. He was a notorious gossip, though, and would surely ask her questions she wasn't prepared to answer. Fortunately Franklin Carroll was working today, and she immediately took her place in the back of his line. He was quick, methodical, and never intruded into anyone's personal affairs. He was also a friend. She had already told him good-bye after services last Sunday, but she had the sudden inclination to do so again. She hated waiting. Tapping her foot softly against the warped floorboards, she took her gloves off, then put them back on again. Each time she fidgeted, her purse, secured by a satin ribbon around her wrist, swung back and forth, back and forth, like a pendulum keeping perfect time to the ticktock of the clock hanging on the wall behind the tellers' windows. The man in front of her took a step forward, but she stayed where she was, hoping to put some distance between them so that she wouldn't have to smell the sour sweat mixed with the pungent odor of fried sausage emanating from his filthy clothes. The man to her left in Malcolm's line smiled at her, letting her see the two missing teeth in the center of his grin. To discourage conversation, she gave him a quick nod and turned her gaze upward to the water stains on the ceiling. It was dank, musty, and horribly hot. She could feel the perspiration gathering at the nape of her neck and tugged on the collar of her starched blouse. Giving Franklin a sympathetic glance, she wondered how any of the employees could work all day in such a dark, gloomy, stifling tomb. She turned to the right and stared longingly at the three closed windows. Sunlight streaked through the finger-smudged glass, casting jagged splotches on the worn floorboards, and fragments of dust particles hung suspended in the stagnant air. If she had to wait much longer, she would incite Sherman MacCorkle's anger by marching over to the windows and throwing all of them open. She gave up the idea as soon as it entered her mind because the president would only close them again and give her a stern lecture about bank security. Besides, she would lose her place in line. It was finally her turn. Hurrying forward, she stumbled and bumped her head against the glass of the teller's window. Her shoe had come off. She shoved her foot back inside and felt the tongue coil under her toes. Behind the tellers, dour-faced Sherman MacCorkle's door was open. He heard the commotion and looked up at her from his desk behind a glass partition. She gave him a weak smile before turning her attention to Franklin. "My shoelace came untied," she said in an attempt to explain her clumsiness. He nodded sympathetically. "Are you all ready to leave?" "Just about," she whispered so that Malcolm, the busybody, wouldn't poke his nose into the conversation. He was already leaning toward Frank, and she knew he was itching to hear the particulars. "I'll miss you," Franklin blurted out. The confession brought a blush that stained his neck and cheeks. Franklin's shyness was an endearing quality, and when the tall, deathly thin man swallowed, his oversized Adam's apple bobbed noticeably. He was at least twenty years her senior, yet he acted like a young boy whenever he was near her. "I'm going to miss you too, Franklin." "Are you going to close your account now?" She nodded as she pushed the folded papers through the arched, fist-sized opening. "I hope everything's in order." He busied himself with the paperwork, checking signatures and numbers, and then opened his cash drawer and began to count out the money. "Four hundred and two dollars is an awful lot of money to be carrying around." "Yes, I know it is," she agreed. "I'll keep a close eye on it. Don't worry." She removed her gloves while he stacked the bills, and when he pushed the money through the opening, she stuffed it into her cloth purse and pulled the strings tight. Franklin cast his employer a furtive glance before leaning forward and pressing his forehead against the glass. "Church won't be the same without you sitting in the pew in front of Mother and me. I wish you weren't leaving. Mother would eventually warm up to you. I'm sure of it." She reached through the opening and impulsively squeezed his hand. "In the short while that I have lived here, you have become such a good friend. I won't ever forget your kindness to me." "Will you write?" "Yes, of course I will." "Send your letters to the bank so Mother won't see them." She smiled. "Yes, I'll do that." A discreet cough told her she'd lingered too long. She picked up her gloves and purse and turned around, searching for a spot out of the traffic where she could retie her shoelace. There was an empty desk in the alcove beyond the swinging gate that separated the customers from the employees. Lemont Morganstaff usually sat there, but like Emmeline MacCorkle, he too was still recovering from the epidemic. She dragged her foot so she wouldn't step out of her shoe again as she made her way across the lobby to the decrepit, scarred desk in front of the windows. Franklin had confided that MacCorkle had purchased all the furniture thirdhand from a printer's shop. His thrifty nature had obviously compelled him to overlook the ink stains blotting the wood and the protruding splinters lying in wait for an uncautious finger. It was sinful the way MacCorkle treated his employees. She knew for a fact that he didn't pay any of his loyal staff a fair wage, because poor Franklin lived a very modest life and could barely afford to keep his mother in the medicinal tonic she seemed to thrive on. She had a notion to go into MacCorkle's brand-spanking-new office, with its shiny mahogany desk and matching file cabinets, and tell him what a cheapskate he was in hopes of shaming him into doing something about the deplorable conditions he forced his staff to endure, and she surely would have done just that if it hadn't been for the possibility that MacCorkle would think Franklin had put her up to it. The president knew they were friends. No, she didn't dare say a word, and so she settled on giving MacCorkle a look of pure disgust instead. Copyright© 1997 by Julie Garwood Excerpted from Come the Spring by Julie Garwood All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.