Cover image for Psychic warrior : inside the CIA's Stargate program : the true story of a soldier's espionage and awakening
Title:
Psychic warrior : inside the CIA's Stargate program : the true story of a soldier's espionage and awakening
Author:
Morehouse, David, 1954-
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York : St. Martin's Press, 1996.
Physical Description:
viii, 258 pages, 8 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations ; 24 cm
Language:
English
Personal Subject:
ISBN:
9780312147082
Format :
Book

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BF1027.M67 A3 1996 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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BF1027.M67 A3 1996 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

An ex-army officer reveals his experiences working for the CIA as a psychic and his spiritual transformation that led him to expose the CIA's Stargate program.


Reviews 1

Publisher's Weekly Review

About a year ago, the media reported that the Pentagon had been training and using psychic spies, operatives who garnered information through "remote viewing." According to Morehouse, the media reports arose from a disinformation campaign conducted by the CIA in cooperation with the Defense Intelligence Agency. Here, Morehouse, a former highly decorated army officer‘and psychic spy in the Star Gate program‘purports to tell the real story and his role in it. Morehouse, we learn, became a psychic literally by accident. He was serving with the infantry in Jordan when he was knocked out by a stray bullet that hit his helmet; afterward, he saw strange visions and experienced out-of-body episodes. Instead of recommending psychiatric treatment, the army placed Morehouse in a top secret program in which agents psychically travel to far-flung sites to "view" prisons, airplane-crash locations and the like. Morehouse's descriptions of his psychic trips are the strength of this book. Most combine mystery and suspense so skillfully that he makes perfectly believable the notion that he "visited" a friend who had been killed in an air crash. But some of his "trips," such as the time-warp call at the burial site of the lost Ark of the Covenant, seem less authentic, though they're equally entertaining. For all the detail in his recounting of his remote-viewing incidents, Morehouse's narrative leaves gaps and unanswered questions, including exactly how the viewing process works, and the Star Gate program's exact provenance. Readers may need to do some remote viewing of their own to fill in the blanks, but overall this is a dramatic tale told with flair. Photos not seen by PW. (Nov.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved