Cover image for The Clinton presidency : campaigning, governing, and the psychology of leadership
Title:
The Clinton presidency : campaigning, governing, and the psychology of leadership
Author:
Renshon, Stanley Allen.
Publication Information:
Boulder : Westview Press, 1995.
Physical Description:
ix, 261 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
Language:
English
Reading Level:
1360 Lexile.
Personal Subject:
ISBN:
9780813319766

9780813319773
Format :
Book

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E885 .R46 1995 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

The Clinton presidency faced a basic set of public questions at the outset regarding its real intentions, strategies, and competence. Would the administration be able to develop and implement policies that were constructive in intent, fair in formulation, and successful in result? Would President Clinton be able to govern as successfully as he campaigned? Would there be a productive fit between Clinton's leadership style and the needs of the public?Additional questions arise about Clinton personally. Many admire him; others distrust him. What realistic basis is there for either view?This book explores these questions and develops an initial appraisal of the Clinton presidency. The chapters herein are framed by theories of political leadership and psychology. They draw on a diverse body of theories, including psychological theories of character and personality, cognitive psychology and communication theory, theories of presidential leadership and performance, and theories of public psychology. The goal is to examine the many facets of leadership and governing that constitute the modern presidency and to locate Bill Clinton's emerging presidency within that framework.Bill Clinton is and likely will remain a controversial president. One objective of this analysis is to provide a clearer, more objective framework in which to evaluate both the man and his approach to political leadership and executive power and the consequences of his approach for public psychology and policy.


Summary

The Clinton presidency faced a basic set of public questions at the outset regarding its real intentions, strategies, and competence. Would the administration be able to develop and implement policies that were constructive in intent, fair in formulation, and successful in result? Would President Clinton be able to govern as successfully as he campaigned? Would there be a productive fit between Clinton's leadership style and the needs of the public?Additional questions arise about Clinton personally. Many admire him; others distrust him. What realistic basis is there for either view?This book explores these questions and develops an initial appraisal of the Clinton presidency. The chapters herein are framed by theories of political leadership and psychology. They draw on a diverse body of theories, including psychological theories of character and personality, cognitive psychology and communication theory, theories of presidential leadership and performance, and theories of public psychology. The goal is to examine the many facets of leadership and governing that constitute the modern presidency and to locate Bill Clinton's emerging presidency within that framework.Bill Clinton is and likely will remain a controversial president. One objective of this analysis is to provide a clearer, more objective framework in which to evaluate both the man and his approach to political leadership and executive power and the consequences of his approach for public psychology and policy.


Author Notes

He is a professor of political science & coordinator of the Interdisciplinary Program in the Psychology of Social & Political Behavior at the City University of New York Graduate Center & a certified psychoanalyst.

(Bowker Author Biography)


He is a professor of political science & coordinator of the Interdisciplinary Program in the Psychology of Social & Political Behavior at the City University of New York Graduate Center & a certified psychoanalyst.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 2

Choice Review

Renshon (City Univ. of New York) has compiled a number of nicely written and thoughtful papers offering different judgments of presidential leadership in the Clinton era. What makes the book especially worthwhile is the effort to provide such judgments from the perspectives of both political science and psychology. Sections of the volume cover such topics as the 1992 campaign, leadership style, the process of leadership, public opinion and mass media, and the psychology of public policy making. Although the title might reasonably lead one to conclude that the essays deal exclusively with Clinton, the book also contains chapters on the 1992 campaigns of George Bush and Ross Perot and one on foreign policy in the post-Cold War era. Overall, the book will be useful to those scholars and students interested in an early critique of certain aspects of the Clinton presidency. It is recommended for upper-division undergraduates and above. M. J. Rozell; Mary Washington College


Choice Review

Renshon (City Univ. of New York) has compiled a number of nicely written and thoughtful papers offering different judgments of presidential leadership in the Clinton era. What makes the book especially worthwhile is the effort to provide such judgments from the perspectives of both political science and psychology. Sections of the volume cover such topics as the 1992 campaign, leadership style, the process of leadership, public opinion and mass media, and the psychology of public policy making. Although the title might reasonably lead one to conclude that the essays deal exclusively with Clinton, the book also contains chapters on the 1992 campaigns of George Bush and Ross Perot and one on foreign policy in the post-Cold War era. Overall, the book will be useful to those scholars and students interested in an early critique of certain aspects of the Clinton presidency. It is recommended for upper-division undergraduates and above.