Cover image for Poetry from A to Z : a guide for young writers
Title:
Poetry from A to Z : a guide for young writers
Author:
Janeczko, Paul B.
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Bradbury Press, [1994]

©1994
Physical Description:
131 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780027476729
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
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PN145 .P56 1994 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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PN145 .P56 1994 Juvenile Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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PN145 .P56 1994 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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PN145 .P56 1994 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Summary

Author Notes

Paul Bryan Janeczko was born in Passaic, New Jersey on July 27, 1945. He received a bachelor's degree in English from St. Francis College in 1967 and a master's degree in English from John Carroll University in 1970. While teaching public high school, he created his own poetry anthology to use in his classes. He retired from teaching in 1990 after 22 years.

He became a poet and anthologist best known for his poetry anthologies for children. From the 1980s through the early 2000s, he was the compiler for several anthologies including Pocket Poems: Selected for a Journey, I Feel a Little Jumpy Around You: A Book of Her Poems and His Poems Collected in Pairs, and A Kick in the Head: An Everyday Guide to Poetic Forms. He wrote several poetry collections including The Crystal Image, Requiem, Worlds Afire, and The Proper Way to Meet a Hedgehog and Other How-to Poems. His novel, Bridges to Cross, was published 1986. He died on February 19, 2019 at the age of 73.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 1

Booklist Review

Gr. 5-7. "You need to find the right words and use them in the best order." Janeczko brings Coleridge's famous dictum right into the world of today's middle-graders and encourages youngsters to give poetry a try. As in his Poetspeak (1983) for older readers, Janeczko selects poems and has the poets talk about writing; but this time, it's his own commentary--warm, sunny, informal, enthusiastic, encouraging, rooted in ordinary things--that carries the narrative. "Try this" is a repeated subhead, and he applies it to everything from haiku to list poems, letter poems, and memory poems. The examples he chooses make up a fine anthology, with contributions by several children's poets as well as adult writers, nearly all of whom tell young poets to read and read as a way to find their own voices. Janeczko's suggestions clearly grow from his own teaching success, and the book will be a natural for creative-writing classes. It will show that although poetry isn't easy, it can be a lot of fun to write about what you imagine. ~--Hazel Rochman