Cover image for The junior thunder lord
Title:
The junior thunder lord
Author:
Yep, Laurence, 1948-
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
[Mahwah, N.J.] : BridgeWater Books, [1994]

©1994
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 29 cm
Summary:
Yue, a Chinese merchant, discovers the wisdom in passing along kindness, when Bear Face, the huge hairy man Yue has befriended, saves his life.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
690 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 4.2 0.5 44229.

Reading Counts RC 3-5 4.4 2 Quiz: 31078 Guided reading level: S.
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780816734542

9780816734559
Format :
Book

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PZ8.1.Y37 JU 1994 Juvenile Non-Fiction Fairy Tales
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PZ8.1.Y37 JU 1994 Juvenile Non-Fiction Childrens Area
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Summary

Summary

Yue, a Chinese merchant, discovers the wisdom in passing along kindness, when Bear Face, the huge hairy man Yue has befriended, saves his life.


Summary

Yue, a Chinese merchant, discovers the wisdom in passing along kindness, when Bear Face, the huge hairy man Yue has befriended, saves his life.


Author Notes

Laurence Yep was born in San Francisco, California on June 14, 1948. He graduated from the University of California at Santa Cruz in 1970 and received a Ph.D. in English from the State University of New York at Buffalo.

He primarily writes fiction for young adults, but has also written and edited several works for adults. His first novel, Sweetwater, was published in 1973. His other books include Dragonwings, Dragon's Gate, Shadow Lord, Child of the Owl, The Earth Dragon Awakes: The San Francisco Earthquake of 1906, and The Dragon's Child: A Story of Angel Island. He has won numerous awards for his work including the Newbery Medal Honor Book, the Boston Globe-Horn Book Award, Jane Addams Children's Book Award, and the Laura Ingalls Wilder Award.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Laurence Yep was born in San Francisco, California on June 14, 1948. He graduated from the University of California at Santa Cruz in 1970 and received a Ph.D. in English from the State University of New York at Buffalo.

He primarily writes fiction for young adults, but has also written and edited several works for adults. His first novel, Sweetwater, was published in 1973. His other books include Dragonwings, Dragon's Gate, Shadow Lord, Child of the Owl, The Earth Dragon Awakes: The San Francisco Earthquake of 1906, and The Dragon's Child: A Story of Angel Island. He has won numerous awards for his work including the Newbery Medal Honor Book, the Boston Globe-Horn Book Award, Jane Addams Children's Book Award, and the Laura Ingalls Wilder Award.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 6

Booklist Review

Ages 5-8. As a struggling student, Yue is helped by a friend who remarks, "Those at the top should help those at the bottom." Years later, as a merchant traveling far from his drought-stricken home, Yue generously buys a meal for Bear Face, a hungry, comically gauche stranger. Bear Face gratefully follows Yue everywhere, saving his life during a storm at sea and finally returning with him to Yue's parched village. Citing the proverb that began the story, Bear Face reveals his true identity--Junior Thunder Lord--and beckons the sky dragons to rain upon his friend's land. From then on, the "village always had all the rain it needed. And when it was pouring the hardest, Yue and his wife would go outside to wave up at their friend as he drove his storm clouds overhead." Yep's spare, crisp language gracefully defers to the dynamic story line, and Van Nutt's striking illustrations. Using the smooth, round lines of caricature and a palette of deep jewel colors, Van Nutt evokes both modernity and antiquity--a fine balance for a seventeenth-century tale with a twentieth-century message. ~--Julie Yates Walton


Publisher's Weekly Review

Yep (The Man Who Tricked a Ghost) here gracefully wraps a 17th-century Chinese fable in a zestful style that speaks immediately to readers and vivifies its moral-that ``those at the top should help those at the bottom.'' Merchant Yue learned that lesson as a dull schoolboy; thus, when he must travel to sell his wares during a drought, he takes pity and feeds the ravenous Bear Face, a huge, shambling man whose manner and bearing the natives find disgusting. Bear Face, in turn, later saves Yue's life. When Yue implores Bear Face to return home with him, he astonishes Yue by first revealing his true identity as a Junior Thunder Lord and then summoning the much-needed rain. Van Nutt's dynamic, detailed illustrations telegraph a range of moods; along with establishing interiors of inns and underwater seascapes, they are also capable of soaring into the roiling dragons and storm clouds of Bear Face's skies. The division between heavens and earth reinforces the gulf between Bear Face and Yue-and the moral-making the happy ending doubly satisfying. Ages 5-9. (Oct.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

Gr 1-3-When Yue was young and not doing well in school, the smartest boy helped him out, saying, ``Those at the top should help those at the bottom.'' Yue becomes a merchant when he grows up and he lives by those words, but never so much as when he leaves his drought-stricken home to find new customers. He encounters a huge man called Bear Face, who is an outcast among the people. Yue is kind to him; in return, Bear Face rescues Yue from drowning. Yue insists that Bear Face accompany him home, where the man reveals himself as a junior thunder lord and repays Yue's kindness with rain. Yep is a skillful storyteller, and his text is simple and effective. The characters are multifaceted; when Bear Face reveals his identity, he does not lose his sense of humor or his mild irreverence for convention. There are no surprises here. Anyone with a grasp of folk tale conventions knows that Bear Face isn't what he seems, but the tale remains satisfying. Van Nutt's cartoonlike pictures are bold and bright, with vibrant colors and nice details, and the cover illustration of Yue huddling in fear before the restored junior thunder lord is enticing. The quality of the artwork is undercut, however, by the lack of variation in the basic features of all but the main characters. While this detracts somewhat from the book, the story is well written and will appeal to a wide audience.-Donna L. Scanlon, Lancaster County Library, PA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Booklist Review

Ages 5-8. As a struggling student, Yue is helped by a friend who remarks, "Those at the top should help those at the bottom." Years later, as a merchant traveling far from his drought-stricken home, Yue generously buys a meal for Bear Face, a hungry, comically gauche stranger. Bear Face gratefully follows Yue everywhere, saving his life during a storm at sea and finally returning with him to Yue's parched village. Citing the proverb that began the story, Bear Face reveals his true identity--Junior Thunder Lord--and beckons the sky dragons to rain upon his friend's land. From then on, the "village always had all the rain it needed. And when it was pouring the hardest, Yue and his wife would go outside to wave up at their friend as he drove his storm clouds overhead." Yep's spare, crisp language gracefully defers to the dynamic story line, and Van Nutt's striking illustrations. Using the smooth, round lines of caricature and a palette of deep jewel colors, Van Nutt evokes both modernity and antiquity--a fine balance for a seventeenth-century tale with a twentieth-century message. ~--Julie Yates Walton


Publisher's Weekly Review

Yep (The Man Who Tricked a Ghost) here gracefully wraps a 17th-century Chinese fable in a zestful style that speaks immediately to readers and vivifies its moral-that ``those at the top should help those at the bottom.'' Merchant Yue learned that lesson as a dull schoolboy; thus, when he must travel to sell his wares during a drought, he takes pity and feeds the ravenous Bear Face, a huge, shambling man whose manner and bearing the natives find disgusting. Bear Face, in turn, later saves Yue's life. When Yue implores Bear Face to return home with him, he astonishes Yue by first revealing his true identity as a Junior Thunder Lord and then summoning the much-needed rain. Van Nutt's dynamic, detailed illustrations telegraph a range of moods; along with establishing interiors of inns and underwater seascapes, they are also capable of soaring into the roiling dragons and storm clouds of Bear Face's skies. The division between heavens and earth reinforces the gulf between Bear Face and Yue-and the moral-making the happy ending doubly satisfying. Ages 5-9. (Oct.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

Gr 1-3-When Yue was young and not doing well in school, the smartest boy helped him out, saying, ``Those at the top should help those at the bottom.'' Yue becomes a merchant when he grows up and he lives by those words, but never so much as when he leaves his drought-stricken home to find new customers. He encounters a huge man called Bear Face, who is an outcast among the people. Yue is kind to him; in return, Bear Face rescues Yue from drowning. Yue insists that Bear Face accompany him home, where the man reveals himself as a junior thunder lord and repays Yue's kindness with rain. Yep is a skillful storyteller, and his text is simple and effective. The characters are multifaceted; when Bear Face reveals his identity, he does not lose his sense of humor or his mild irreverence for convention. There are no surprises here. Anyone with a grasp of folk tale conventions knows that Bear Face isn't what he seems, but the tale remains satisfying. Van Nutt's cartoonlike pictures are bold and bright, with vibrant colors and nice details, and the cover illustration of Yue huddling in fear before the restored junior thunder lord is enticing. The quality of the artwork is undercut, however, by the lack of variation in the basic features of all but the main characters. While this detracts somewhat from the book, the story is well written and will appeal to a wide audience.-Donna L. Scanlon, Lancaster County Library, PA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.