Cover image for Max and Ruby's first Greek Myth: Pandora's box
Title:
Max and Ruby's first Greek Myth: Pandora's box
Author:
Wells, Rosemary.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Dial Books for Young Readers, 1993.
Physical Description:
24 unnumbered pages : color illustrations ; 21 cm
Summary:
Ruby tries to stop her younger brother Max from sneaking into her room and snooping by reading him an altered version of "Pandora's Box."
Language:
English
Reading Level:
AD 530 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 2.6 0.5 9073.

Reading Counts RC K-2 3.5 1 Quiz: 16270 Guided reading level: K.
ISBN:
9780803715240

9780803715257
Format :
Book

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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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On Order

Summary

Summary

When Max snoops in his sister's jewelry box, she reads her own version of the classic Greek myth about how Pandora's curiosity sets loose all the horrors of the world. Full-color illustrations.


Author Notes

Rosemary Wells was born in New York City on January 29, 1943. She studied at the Museum School in Boston. Without her degree, she left school at the age of 19 to get married. She began her career in publishing, working as an art editor and designer first at Allyn and Bacon and later at Macmillan Publishing.

She is an author and illustrator of over 60 books for children and young adults. Her first book was an illustrated edition of Gilbert and Sullivan's I Have a Song to Sing-O. Her other works include Martha's Birthday, The Fog Comes on Little Pig Feet, Unfortunately Harriet, Mary on Horseback, and Timothy Goes to School. She also created the characters of Max and Ruby, Noisy Nora, and Yoko, which are featured in some of her books. She has won numerous awards including a Children's Book Council Award for Noisy Nora in 1974, the Edgar Allan Poe award for two young adult books, Through the Looking Glass and When No One Was Looking, and the Boston Globe-Horn Book Award for Shy Charles.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

Ages 4-7. Wells uses the story-within-a-story form for her newest Max adventure, a takeoff on Pandora's box, which is clever and great fun even though it falls a tad flat at the close. Paying no attention to the sign on his big sister's door ("No! This Means You!"), Max gleefully enters Ruby's room. When Ruby catches him, she reads him a story about Pandora, who, overcome by the "magnetic force" of temptation, lets loose "a hundred twister bees, a slew of fire ants, and clouds of Mexican jumping weevils" when she opens her mother's magic jewelry box. The outcome is a surprise. Does Max get the point of the story, the point of the sign on the door? Well, let's just say that the message he comes away with isn't quite what Ruby had in mind. Though gray with pink ears and a toga, Pandora looks suspiciously like our obstreperous friend Max. She's just as subtly expressive, too--whether she's playing in the sprinkler (a jug with water spritzing out of its mouth), peeking into the jewelry box, or being overwhelmed by pesky flying things. The ending wordplay may be a bit obscure for little ones, but fans of the droll, mischievous bunny will welcome him back all the same. They'll love his alter ego as well. ~--Stephanie Zvirin


Publisher's Weekly Review

Wells adds engaging new dimensions to her ongoing saga of the inimitable bunny siblings as Ruby introduces Max, her insatiably inquisitive brother, to the tale of a calamitously curious youngster. After a sign tacked to her door (``NO! This means you!'') fails to keep Max out of her room and away from her jewelry box, Ruby decides to deliver a moral to her brother by reading him ``a story about sneaking and peeking.'' The Pandora of Ruby's tale is a bunny whose mother goes off to the store, instructing her not to open the magic jewelry box. The daughter does, of course, and after ``a hundred twister bees, a slew of fire ants, and clouds of Mexican jumping weevils'' fly out, a green spider remains. ``I'm your only hope!'' he says, then proceeds to devour the bugs and save the day. However perfect a role model for Max this lucky Pandora may be, the ending lets readers know that, once again, the endearing fellow chooses not to absorb the lesson Ruby tries to teach. Wells's art (including endpapers filled with amusing Grecian bunnies) is as understated and clever as ever. Ages 4-8. (Sept.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

PreS-Gr 3‘Bossy Ruby instructs her younger brother on the hazards of snooping via her thoroughly modern retelling of the classic myth. These rabbit siblings have never been funnier‘or more endearing. (Oct. 1993) (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.