Cover image for The quality journey : how winning the Baldrige sparked the remaking of IBM
Title:
The quality journey : how winning the Baldrige sparked the remaking of IBM
Author:
Boyett, Joseph H.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York, NY : Dutton, 1993.
Physical Description:
349 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
General Note:
Includes index.
Language:
English
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780525936596
Format :
Book

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HD9696.C64 I48316 1993 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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Summary

Author Notes

Stephen Schwartz, and author and journalist, has reported on religious affairs in the Balkans and other areas around the world for many years. He was on the staff of the San Francisco Chronicle, worked as a reporter for the Weekly Forward, and is currently a news writer at Voice of America. He lives in Washington, D.C.


Reviews 1

Publisher's Weekly Review

In one of this year's top business books, Boyett ( Workplace 2000) and three senior IBM executives ask a complex question: Can IBM--a bureaucratic, tradition-bound and product-driven corporation with a defect rate ``slightly worse than the average American company''--reinvent itself, become market-driven and win the prestigious Malcolm Baldridge National Quality Award? Though ponderous-looking, with detailed charts and appendixes, this volume offers insightful, human details about the daily pressures managers confronted in IBM's Rochester, Minn., facility after their failed 1989 Baldridge application signaled problems with leadership, customer feedback and teamwork. In response, Rochester's managers embraced a plan calling for near perfection in quality and reduction in the time cycle for meeting customer needs. The plan prompted IBM to launch its ``Market-Driven Quality'' program. In 1990 Rochester captured the Baldridge, which is administered by the U.S. Department of Commerce. The book ends in 1992, with IBM's steep setbacks and layoffs. In light of board chairman John Akers's recent departure and further layoffs, the jury is still out on whether IBM has really been ``reinvented.'' Still, this is a well-written, exciting study. (Oct.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved