Cover image for The mystery of the cupboard
Title:
The mystery of the cupboard
Author:
Banks, Lynne Reid, 1929-
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : [HarperCollins], [1993]

©1993
Physical Description:
240 unnumbered pages : illustrations ; 22 cm
Summary:
After the family moves to the country to a house recently inherited by his mother, Omri finds many secrets revealed to him when he accidently discovers the link between the house and the magic cupboard. Sequel to "The Secret of the Indian."
General Note:
Also published by Morrow.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
770 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR MG 4.9 7.0 8541.

Reading Counts RC 6-8 6.1 12 Quiz: 08182 Guided reading level: R.
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780688121389

9780688126353

9781439553435
Format :
Book

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Summary

Summary

When Omri puts away the cupboard in The Secret of the Indian, he vows that it will be forever. Little Bear, Boone, and the other miniature figures he had brought to life will remain plastic. But then Omri and his family move to an old country farmhouse that they inherited from a distant relative, and he unearths a faded journal hidden in the thatched roof. To Omri's utter amazement, the notebook was written by his "wicked" great-great-aunt Jessica Charlotte on her deathbed. Even more astonishing: It reveals how the cupboard and its magic were created--and changed the destiny of his family,

In trying to right a wrong done in the past, Omri finds he has no choice but to break the promise he made to himself. The magical cupboard is opened once more!

The Mystery of the Cupboard transports readers from the peaceful English countryside of today to, the elegant drawing rooms and boisterous music halls of pre-World War I London and introduces them to an unforgettable new set of characters--both big and small--and an enthralling series of adventures. Continuing the enchantment of the earlier works in the series, this is Lynne Reid Banks's richest, most memorable "Indian in the Cupboard" book ever.

"In this latest installment in the award-winning Indian in the Cupboard series, Omri's fascination with the little people of the cupboard has matured into an obsession with discovering the origin of their life-giving magic. With the help of his great-aunt's hidden diary and a meeting with an elderly roof-thatcher, Omri is able to piece together his own family's history....These rich, well-rounded characters speak eloquently and entertainingly within a polished mystery."--Publishers Weekly.


Author Notes

Lynne Reid Banks was born in London, England on July I929. After studying at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art, she acted and wrote for the repertory stage.Eventually, she turned to journalism, becoming one of Britain's first female television news reporters. Banks was fired from her job as a reporter, and while working a different job, she wrote her first novel, which went on to become a best seller.


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

Gr. 5-8. Picking up at the end of The Secret of the Indian , Banks offers a fourth book in the "cupboard" series. After inheriting a house from distant relatives, Omri's family decides to move to the country. During the rethatching of the family's new residence, Omri discovers a journal and a box that once belonged to his great-great-aunt Jessica Charlotte. The diary divulges information about the beginnings of the magic cupboard (which originally belonged to Jessica Charlotte); the box contains several plastic figures, who, when brought to life, fill in the gaps to explain the cupboard's secrets. Although the story is more about Jessica Charlotte than about Omri, readers won't be disappointed, because they'll be swept up in the details of the life of this boisterous and often scandalous music hall girl of pre-World War I London. Omri remains ever cautious of the dangers of "playing" with the cupboard, yet, when his father, at the end, accidentally brings all the plastic characters to life, Omri is secretly pleased and excited. And, since Omri's father has not yet developed his son's sensible restraint, Banks leaves open the possibility of further adventures. Librarians need to be aware of the controversy over the stereotypical characterization of the plastic Indians when they are brought to life. (Reviewed Apr. 1, 1993)0688121381Kay Weisman


Publisher's Weekly Review

In this latest installment in the award-winning Indian in the Cupboard series, Omri's fascination with the little people of the cupboard has matured into an obsession with discovering the origin of their life-giving magic. With the help of his great-aunt's hidden diary and a meeting with an elderly roof-thatcher, Omri is able to piece together his own family's history--one that gave rise to the wondrous events of the last few years. In the process he takes a big risk in allowing the secret to be disclosed to an adult. Relying much less on the sheer derring-do typical of earlier episodes, Banks takes an introspective turn here, weaving a more adult story of disappointment and heartbreak into Omri's ever-widening understanding of the cupboard's mystery. Banks's series has grown up, and though some readers may miss the magical Peter Pan-like world of earlier installments, these rich, well-rounded characters speak eloquently and entertainingly within a polished mystery structure. While observing the parameters of a series, Banks demonstrates an impressive versatility, never swerving from her trademark disarming candor and unaffected yet elegant style. Illustrations not seen by PW . Ages 10-up. (Apr.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

Gr 3-6--Indian in the Cupboard (Doubleday, 1985) fans, rejoice! Here's another in the series, and it will appeal most to those familiar with the characters and events in the earlier books. When a distant relative dies, leaving Omri's mother an old farmhouse, the whole family moves to the country. As old thatch is removed in preparation for reroofing, Omri finds a notebook written by ``wicked'' great-great-Aunt Jessica as she lay dying, which reveals the secret of the cupboard, and how and why it, and its magic, came into being. New little people are introduced, and once again, Omri learns the folly--and danger--of playing with people's lives. Little Bear and Bright Stars, main characters from the previous books, make their appearance only on the last page, when the boy's father is let in on the secret. ``From now on, thought Omri, whatever happens--and plenty will--Dad's in on it. Which is bound to make things . . . very, very complicated.'' One has to wonder if he will allow the adventures to continue. --Li Stark, North Castle Public Library, Armonk, NY (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.