Cover image for In the electric mist with Confederate dead
Title:
In the electric mist with Confederate dead
Author:
Burke, James Lee, 1936-
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Hyperion, [1993]

©1993
Physical Description:
344 pages ; 25 cm
Language:
English
Geographic Term:
ISBN:
9781562828820
Format :
Book

Available:*

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Central Library FICTION Adult Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Central Library FICTION Adult Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Central Library FICTION DEPT Adult Mass Market Paperback Central Closed Stacks
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Clearfield Library X Adult Fiction Mystery/Suspense
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Summary

Summary

Haunted by the reemergence of a forty-year-old unsolved murder, detective Dave Robicheaux must also contend with a spate of serial killings of prostitutes and local dissension about the movie company that is shooting in town.


Author Notes

James Lee Burke, winner of two Edgar awards, is the author of nineteen previous novels, many of them "New York Times" bestsellers, including "Cimmaron Rose", Cadillac Jukebox", & "Sunset Limited". He & his wife divide their time between Missoula, Montana, & New Iberia, Louisiana.

(Publisher Provided) James Lee Burke was born in Houston, Texas on December 5, 1936. He received a B. A. in English and an M. A. from the University of Missouri in 1958 and 1960, respectively. Before becoming a full-time author, he worked as a land surveyor, newspaper reporter, college English professor, social worker, and instructor in the U. S. Job Corps.

His novel The Lost Get-Back Boogie was rejected 111 times over a period of nine years, and upon publication was nominated for a Pulitzer Prize. He writes the Dave Robicheaux series and the Billy Bob Holland series. He has won numerous awards including the CWA/Macallan Gold Dagger for fiction for Sunset Limited and the Edgar Award in 1989 for Black Cherry Blues and in 1997 for Cimarron Rose. His short stories have appeared in The Atlantic Monthly, New Stories from the South, Best American Short Stories, Antioch Review, Southern Review, and The Kenyon Review. Two of his novels, Heaven's Prisoners and Two for Texas, have been made into motion pictures starring Alec Baldwin and Tommy Lee Jones, respectively. He made The New York Times High Profiles List with Wayfaring Stranger.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

Cajun cop Dave Robicheaux of New Iberia, Louisiana, is fighting a losing battle. Keeping the modern world at bay is less possible than ever: oil companies pollute the oyster beds, bad guys run free, and Cajun joie de vivre is reduced to sappy T-shirt slogans. For several books now, Robicheaux has been reacting to this gradual erosion of all he cares about by striking out violently at the perpetrators, putting his family in danger in the process, and then retreating to the ever-more-fragile sanctuary of his bayou bait shop. It happens again in Burke's sixth Robicheaux adventure, as the body of a man murdered 35 years ago turns up in the bayou, a serial killer is on the loose, and a movie company comes to town backed by a wiseguy thug. This time, though, Dave's not fighting his losing battle alone; no, a straggling band of Confederate soldiers, wandering through time and intimately familiar with lost causes, has come to help. You can't write about Louisiana without at least nodding toward its Gothic heritage, that supernatural realm hovering out there in the morning mist; somehow, it seems only natural that Robicheaux, his eyes always on the past, should be the one to walk through the curtain. Burke's daring mix of genres may offend his more single-mindedly hard-boiled fans, but others will see its perfect fit, as metaphor and as reflection of character. Robicheaux's electric mist is Jay Gatsby's green light across the bay. Men out of time, they're both rowing their boats against the current, and we applaud their obstinacy as we admit their foolishness. Lost causes are like that. (Reviewed Mar. 1, 1993)1562828827Bill Ott


Publisher's Weekly Review

This is the fifth mystery featuring Cajun detective Dave Robicheaux. (July) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


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