Cover image for Tongues of jade
Title:
Tongues of jade
Author:
Yep, Laurence, 1948-
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York, NY : HarperCollins, [1991]

©1991
Physical Description:
ix, 194 pages ; 24 cm
Summary:
A retelling of seventeen Chinese American folktales from a variety of Chinese communities in the United States.
Language:
English
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780060224707

9780060224714
Format :
Book

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PZ8.1.Y43 TO 1991 Juvenile Non-Fiction Fairy Tales
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Summary

Summary

A retelling of seventeen Chinese American folktales from a variety of Chinese communities in the United States.


Summary

A retelling of seventeen Chinese American folktales from a variety of Chinese communities in the United States.


Author Notes

Laurence Yep was born in San Francisco, California on June 14, 1948. He graduated from the University of California at Santa Cruz in 1970 and received a Ph.D. in English from the State University of New York at Buffalo.

He primarily writes fiction for young adults, but has also written and edited several works for adults. His first novel, Sweetwater, was published in 1973. His other books include Dragonwings, Dragon's Gate, Shadow Lord, Child of the Owl, The Earth Dragon Awakes: The San Francisco Earthquake of 1906, and The Dragon's Child: A Story of Angel Island. He has won numerous awards for his work including the Newbery Medal Honor Book, the Boston Globe-Horn Book Award, Jane Addams Children's Book Award, and the Laura Ingalls Wilder Award.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Laurence Yep was born in San Francisco, California on June 14, 1948. He graduated from the University of California at Santa Cruz in 1970 and received a Ph.D. in English from the State University of New York at Buffalo.

He primarily writes fiction for young adults, but has also written and edited several works for adults. His first novel, Sweetwater, was published in 1973. His other books include Dragonwings, Dragon's Gate, Shadow Lord, Child of the Owl, The Earth Dragon Awakes: The San Francisco Earthquake of 1906, and The Dragon's Child: A Story of Angel Island. He has won numerous awards for his work including the Newbery Medal Honor Book, the Boston Globe-Horn Book Award, Jane Addams Children's Book Award, and the Laura Ingalls Wilder Award.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 6

Booklist Review

Gr. 6-9. Retold by Yep, here are 17 stories that come from a variety of Chinese-American communities. Filled with wonder and magic, the tales present, among others, talking animals, helpful spirits who live in a melon, and a fisherman who dispenses advice as well as wizardry. This is a companion volume to The Rainbow People , which contains stories that Yep found in WPA collections. Though not quite as captivating as the stories in the previous book, this assortment displays the same kind of earthy charm, and Yep's appealing retellings add verve to the more enigmatic tales. A real plus is Weisner's dust jacket featuring an elderly man, book in hand, with mountains and lightning in the background. Though not a conventional YA cover, it holds a mysterious attraction. (Reviewed Dec. 15, 1991)0060224703Ilene Cooper


Publisher's Weekly Review

Noted children's author Yep ( The Rainbow People ; The Star Fisher ) scrupulously culls numerous early Chinese American tales, most of them collected as part of a 1930s WPA project in Oakland's Chinatown, and gracefully retells them, weaving everything together with perceptive commentary on the stories' origins and intents. Many of the virtues and morals espoused are from familiar folktale territory--the importance of respect for parents (``The Little Emperor'') and of kindness to others (``Waters of Gold'') and the pitfalls of greed (``The Rat in the Wall''). The stories are liberally dosed with magic, and all praise the qualities--patience and diligence, for example--necessary to succeed in a foreign and often hostile land. Kudos to Yep for preserving and interpreting these important historical links in the Chinese American experience. Illustrations not seen by PW . Ages 8-12. (Oct.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

Gr 3-7-- Drawing on the same WPA project that provided the bare bones for his Rainbow People (HarperCollins, 1989), Yep has crafted a fine collection of short stories based in the oral Chinese-American tradition. Tongues of Jade has a distinctly more Chinese feeling than the previous title, and supernatural tales predominate. Organized under headings like ``Roots,'' ``Family Ties,'' etc., the stories are sometimes thoughtful, always effective, and usually point to some moral. The writing is replete with lush descriptions, witty asides, and crackling dialogue. Each story is a world of its own; each is successful and satisfying. All open with an attractive ink-and-wash illustration. The selections range from tragic to touching to richly humorous. The only peculiarities are the mini-essays that introduce the sections. While earnest in intent, they are not substantial enough to supply meaningful context and tie the pieces together by the slenderest of threads. This aside, Yep has gathered an excellent compilation of folktales that will be enjoyed by a wide audience of readers--and listeners. --John Philbrook, San Francisco Public Library (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Booklist Review

Gr. 6-9. Retold by Yep, here are 17 stories that come from a variety of Chinese-American communities. Filled with wonder and magic, the tales present, among others, talking animals, helpful spirits who live in a melon, and a fisherman who dispenses advice as well as wizardry. This is a companion volume to The Rainbow People , which contains stories that Yep found in WPA collections. Though not quite as captivating as the stories in the previous book, this assortment displays the same kind of earthy charm, and Yep's appealing retellings add verve to the more enigmatic tales. A real plus is Weisner's dust jacket featuring an elderly man, book in hand, with mountains and lightning in the background. Though not a conventional YA cover, it holds a mysterious attraction. (Reviewed Dec. 15, 1991)0060224703Ilene Cooper


Publisher's Weekly Review

Noted children's author Yep ( The Rainbow People ; The Star Fisher ) scrupulously culls numerous early Chinese American tales, most of them collected as part of a 1930s WPA project in Oakland's Chinatown, and gracefully retells them, weaving everything together with perceptive commentary on the stories' origins and intents. Many of the virtues and morals espoused are from familiar folktale territory--the importance of respect for parents (``The Little Emperor'') and of kindness to others (``Waters of Gold'') and the pitfalls of greed (``The Rat in the Wall''). The stories are liberally dosed with magic, and all praise the qualities--patience and diligence, for example--necessary to succeed in a foreign and often hostile land. Kudos to Yep for preserving and interpreting these important historical links in the Chinese American experience. Illustrations not seen by PW . Ages 8-12. (Oct.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

Gr 3-7-- Drawing on the same WPA project that provided the bare bones for his Rainbow People (HarperCollins, 1989), Yep has crafted a fine collection of short stories based in the oral Chinese-American tradition. Tongues of Jade has a distinctly more Chinese feeling than the previous title, and supernatural tales predominate. Organized under headings like ``Roots,'' ``Family Ties,'' etc., the stories are sometimes thoughtful, always effective, and usually point to some moral. The writing is replete with lush descriptions, witty asides, and crackling dialogue. Each story is a world of its own; each is successful and satisfying. All open with an attractive ink-and-wash illustration. The selections range from tragic to touching to richly humorous. The only peculiarities are the mini-essays that introduce the sections. While earnest in intent, they are not substantial enough to supply meaningful context and tie the pieces together by the slenderest of threads. This aside, Yep has gathered an excellent compilation of folktales that will be enjoyed by a wide audience of readers--and listeners. --John Philbrook, San Francisco Public Library (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.