Cover image for Anonymously yours
Title:
Anonymously yours
Author:
Peck, Richard, 1934-
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Englewood Cliffs, N.J. : J. Messner, 1991.
Physical Description:
122 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
Summary:
The popular author describes how he grew up in Decatur, Illinois, went into teaching, and eventually became a writer, incorporating his earlier experiences into novels intended to reach and change young readers.
Language:
English
Genre:
ISBN:
9780671741624

9780671741617
Format :
Book

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PS3566.E2526 Z47 1991 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

The popular author describes how he grew up in Decatur, Illinois, went into teaching, and eventually became a writer, incorporating his earlier experiences into novels intended to reach and change young readers.


Summary

The popular author describes how he grew up in Decatur, Illinois, went into teaching, and eventually became a writer, incorporating his earlier experiences into novels intended to reach and change young readers.


Author Notes

Richard Peck was born in Decatur, Illinois on April 5, 1934. He received a bachelor's degree in English literature from DePauw University in 1956. After graduation, he served two years in the U.S. Army in Germany, where he worked as a chaplain's assistant writing sermons and completing paperwork. He received a master's degree in English from Southern Illinois University in 1959. He taught high school English in Illinois and New York City.

He stopped teaching in 1971 to write a novel. His first book, Don't Look and It Won't Hurt, was published in 1972 and was adapted as the 1992 film Gas Food Lodging. He wrote more than 40 books for both adults and young adults including Amanda/Miranda, Those Summer Girls I Never Met, The River Between Us, A Long Way from Chicago, A Season of Gifts, The Teacher's Funeral, Fair Weather, Here Lies the Librarian, On the Wings of Heroes, and The Best Man. A Year down Yonder won the Newbery Medal in 2001 and Are You in the House Alone? won an Edgar Award. The Ghost Belonged to Me was adapted into the film Child of Glass. He received the MAE Award in 1990 and the National Humanities Medal in 2002. He died following a long battle with cancer on May 23, 2018 at the age of 84.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Richard Peck was born in Decatur, Illinois on April 5, 1934. He received a bachelor's degree in English literature from DePauw University in 1956. After graduation, he served two years in the U.S. Army in Germany, where he worked as a chaplain's assistant writing sermons and completing paperwork. He received a master's degree in English from Southern Illinois University in 1959. He taught high school English in Illinois and New York City.

He stopped teaching in 1971 to write a novel. His first book, Don't Look and It Won't Hurt, was published in 1972 and was adapted as the 1992 film Gas Food Lodging. He wrote more than 40 books for both adults and young adults including Amanda/Miranda, Those Summer Girls I Never Met, The River Between Us, A Long Way from Chicago, A Season of Gifts, The Teacher's Funeral, Fair Weather, Here Lies the Librarian, On the Wings of Heroes, and The Best Man. A Year down Yonder won the Newbery Medal in 2001 and Are You in the House Alone? won an Edgar Award. The Ghost Belonged to Me was adapted into the film Child of Glass. He received the MAE Award in 1990 and the National Humanities Medal in 2002. He died following a long battle with cancer on May 23, 2018 at the age of 84.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 4

Booklist Review

Gr. 6-9. Noting "there's nothing more pathetic than a writer trying to make himself interesting," the popular, award-winning, and prolific Peck writes about his own life in his latest book. Focusing especially on how he became a writer for adolescents, he describes how the people, places, and events significant to him appear in his books. Arranged chronologically, chapters are introduced by an excerpt from one of Peck's works that reflects a particular period in the author's life. Revealing how Peck writes as well as why, his memoirs are filled with quips, advice, and commentary, much of which seems aimed at adults although the book is addressed to teenagers. Aspiring writers will be interested in the advice directed to them, and Peck's fans will enjoy connecting the author's experiences with their favorite characters. An eight-page black-and-white photo section is included, and a list of Peck's works is appended. (Reviewed Apr. 15, 1992)0671741624Karen Hutt


School Library Journal Review

Gr 6-12 --Peck's autobiography is what one would expect--recollections of the author's Midwestern youth, college life at home and abroad, stint in the army, teaching career, and development as a writer. Excerpts from his books abound; he cites passages from his novels in which people and episodes from his life emerge. The full text of ``Priscilla and the Wimps,'' a short story with far-reaching effects, is also included. He concludes with advice for prospective writers; the first of eight rules is, ``Never write what you know. Write what you can find out.'' Good quality black-and-white photographs of the author and his family enhance the personal narrative. Although not so candid and innovative as M. E. Kerr's Me Me Me Me (HarperCollins, 1983), this memoir is nevertheless engaging and filled with insight into Peck's creative processes. --Pat Katka, San Diego Public Library (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Booklist Review

Gr. 6-9. Noting "there's nothing more pathetic than a writer trying to make himself interesting," the popular, award-winning, and prolific Peck writes about his own life in his latest book. Focusing especially on how he became a writer for adolescents, he describes how the people, places, and events significant to him appear in his books. Arranged chronologically, chapters are introduced by an excerpt from one of Peck's works that reflects a particular period in the author's life. Revealing how Peck writes as well as why, his memoirs are filled with quips, advice, and commentary, much of which seems aimed at adults although the book is addressed to teenagers. Aspiring writers will be interested in the advice directed to them, and Peck's fans will enjoy connecting the author's experiences with their favorite characters. An eight-page black-and-white photo section is included, and a list of Peck's works is appended. (Reviewed Apr. 15, 1992)0671741624Karen Hutt


School Library Journal Review

Gr 6-12 --Peck's autobiography is what one would expect--recollections of the author's Midwestern youth, college life at home and abroad, stint in the army, teaching career, and development as a writer. Excerpts from his books abound; he cites passages from his novels in which people and episodes from his life emerge. The full text of ``Priscilla and the Wimps,'' a short story with far-reaching effects, is also included. He concludes with advice for prospective writers; the first of eight rules is, ``Never write what you know. Write what you can find out.'' Good quality black-and-white photographs of the author and his family enhance the personal narrative. Although not so candid and innovative as M. E. Kerr's Me Me Me Me (HarperCollins, 1983), this memoir is nevertheless engaging and filled with insight into Peck's creative processes. --Pat Katka, San Diego Public Library (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.