Cover image for Intrinsic motivation
Title:
Intrinsic motivation
Author:
Deci, Edward L. (Edward Lewis), 1942-
Publication Information:
New York ; London : Plenum Press, 1976.
Physical Description:
xi, 324 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
General Note:
Originally published: New York : Plenum Press, 1975.

Includes index.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780306344015
Format :
Book

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BF683 .D43 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks-Non circulating
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Summary

Summary

As I begin to write this Preface, I feel a rush of excitement. I have now finished the book; my gestalt is coming into completion. Throughout the months that I have been writing this, I have, indeed, been intrinsically motivated. Now that it is finished I feel quite competent and self-determining (see Chapter 2). Whether or not those who read the book will perceive me that way is also a concern of mine (an extrinsic one), but it is a wholly separate issue from the intrinsic rewards I have been experiencing. This book presents a theoretical perspective. It reviews an enormous amount of research which establishes unequivocally that intrinsic motivation exists. Also considered herein are various approaches to the conceptualizing of intrinsic motivation. The book concentrates on the approach which has developed out of the work of Robert White (1959), namely, that intrinsically motivated behaviors are ones which a person engages in so that he may feel competent and self-determining in relation to his environment. The book then considers the development of intrinsic motiva tion, how behaviors are motivated intrinsically, how they relate to and how intrinsic motivation is extrinsically motivated behaviors, affected by extrinsic rewards and controls. It also considers how changes in intrinsic motivation relate to changes in attitudes, how people attribute motivation to each other, how the attribution process is motivated, and how the process of perceiving motivation (and other internal states) in oneself relates to perceiving them in others."