Cover image for Dictionary for business & finance
Title:
Dictionary for business & finance
Author:
Terry, John V., 1920-
Personal Author:
Edition:
Second edition.
Publication Information:
Fayetteville : University of Arkansas Press, 1990.
Physical Description:
xiv, 399 pages : illustrations, 1 map ; 24 cm
Language:
English
ISBN:
9781557281692

9781557281708
Format :
Book

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HF1001 .T43 1990 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks-Non circulating
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Summary

Summary

Defines terms used in business, economics, statistics, and management, and includes appendices for abbreviations, ratios, formulas, and equations.


Summary

Defines terms used in business, economics, statistics, and management, and includes appendices for abbreviations, ratios, formulas, and equations.


Reviews 4

Library Journal Review

These two dictionaries, although similar in subject matter, differ markedly. To begin with, Thomsett's paperback is simply a reprint of his 1986 hardcover, Investment and Securities Dictionary ( LJ 3/1/87), which is still in print. It contains concise definitions of over 2000 terms, useful charts and diagrams, and three helpful appendixes. See also Thomsett's Insurance Dictionary , reviewed below. Terry's dictionary defines more than twice as many technical words and phrases, including many legal expressions in Latin. Eleven brief appendixes supplement the glossary. Although Terry includes more recent material, e.g., a review of the 1986 Tax Reform Act, Thomsett provides definitions of scores of terms omitted from Terry's otherwise more inclusive work. Unfortunately, neither defines such current expressions as greenmail, leveraged buyout, and poison pill defense. Nevertheless, both contain some material not found in other specialized dictionaries. As a library purchase, Terry's work--newer and more comprehensive--is preferable.-- Leonard Grundt, Nassau Community Coll. Lib., Garden City, N.Y. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Choice Review

Designed to serve as a cross-disciplinary source for current definitions of "legal, insurance, real estate, investment, marketing and accounting terms," this book generally fulfills its mission of providing definitions for insurance, real estate, and especially, legal terms. It offsets these strengths with organizational flaws and inconsistency of entries. Entries are found, for instance, on the Aden Analysis newsletter and economist Arthur Laffer, but no information is provided about quality circles, just-in-time inventory, Theories X, Y, and Z, or economists Milton Friedman and John Maynard Keynes. When cross-references are provided, they serve as often to frustrate as to help readers. Reference is made from the entry on the Beta coefficient to more information in Appendix D, but that information is to be found in Appendix E. Those looking for information on the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 would find it only under ERISA with not so much as a cross-reference under the Act's full name. Those looking for an entry on the 1986 Tax Reform Act would search in vain, despite cross-references to it from more than one entry. A more thorough editing would, no doubt, have prevented many such problems. Perhaps that will occur in a later edition, and one will no longer find differently worded definitions for "Employee Stock Option Plans (ESOP)" and "ESOP (Employee Stock Option Plans)" seven pages apart. Until and unless this happens, Terry's book is probably best used to supplement reference works such as David Brownstone's VNR Dictionary of Business and Finance (CH, Dec '80) or Jack P. Friedman's Dictionary of Business Terms (1987). Despite its flaws, recommended (with caveat) for use in comprehensive business reference collections, or at schools offering course work in insurance, real estate, or business law. D. Highsmith California State University, Fullerton


Library Journal Review

These two dictionaries, although similar in subject matter, differ markedly. To begin with, Thomsett's paperback is simply a reprint of his 1986 hardcover, Investment and Securities Dictionary ( LJ 3/1/87), which is still in print. It contains concise definitions of over 2000 terms, useful charts and diagrams, and three helpful appendixes. See also Thomsett's Insurance Dictionary , reviewed below. Terry's dictionary defines more than twice as many technical words and phrases, including many legal expressions in Latin. Eleven brief appendixes supplement the glossary. Although Terry includes more recent material, e.g., a review of the 1986 Tax Reform Act, Thomsett provides definitions of scores of terms omitted from Terry's otherwise more inclusive work. Unfortunately, neither defines such current expressions as greenmail, leveraged buyout, and poison pill defense. Nevertheless, both contain some material not found in other specialized dictionaries. As a library purchase, Terry's work--newer and more comprehensive--is preferable.-- Leonard Grundt, Nassau Community Coll. Lib., Garden City, N.Y. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Choice Review

Designed to serve as a cross-disciplinary source for current definitions of "legal, insurance, real estate, investment, marketing and accounting terms," this book generally fulfills its mission of providing definitions for insurance, real estate, and especially, legal terms. It offsets these strengths with organizational flaws and inconsistency of entries. Entries are found, for instance, on the Aden Analysis newsletter and economist Arthur Laffer, but no information is provided about quality circles, just-in-time inventory, Theories X, Y, and Z, or economists Milton Friedman and John Maynard Keynes. When cross-references are provided, they serve as often to frustrate as to help readers. Reference is made from the entry on the Beta coefficient to more information in Appendix D, but that information is to be found in Appendix E. Those looking for information on the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 would find it only under ERISA with not so much as a cross-reference under the Act's full name. Those looking for an entry on the 1986 Tax Reform Act would search in vain, despite cross-references to it from more than one entry. A more thorough editing would, no doubt, have prevented many such problems. Perhaps that will occur in a later edition, and one will no longer find differently worded definitions for "Employee Stock Option Plans (ESOP)" and "ESOP (Employee Stock Option Plans)" seven pages apart. Until and unless this happens, Terry's book is probably best used to supplement reference works such as David Brownstone's VNR Dictionary of Business and Finance (CH, Dec '80) or Jack P. Friedman's Dictionary of Business Terms (1987). Despite its flaws, recommended (with caveat) for use in comprehensive business reference collections, or at schools offering course work in insurance, real estate, or business law. D. Highsmith California State University, Fullerton