Cover image for Uncle Willie and the soup kitchen
Title:
Uncle Willie and the soup kitchen
Author:
DiSalvo, DyAnne.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Morrow Junior Books, 1991.
Summary:
A boy spends the day with Uncle Willie in the soup kitchen where he works preparing and serving food for the hungry.
Language:
English
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 3.3 0.5 58975.

Reading Counts RC K-2 3.1 2 Quiz: 27930 Guided reading level: N.
ISBN:
9780688091651

9780688091668
Format :
Book

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Summary

Summary

A boy spends the day with Uncle Willie in the soup kitchen where he works preparing and serving food for the hungry.


Summary

A boy spends the day with Uncle Willie in the soup kitchen where he works preparing and serving food for the hungry.


Author Notes

DyAnne DiSalvo-Ryan graduated from the School of Visual Arts in New York. She is an author and illustrator of more than forty picture books for children. She has illustrated books written by Beverly Cleary, Mary Pope Osborne, Jean Fritz, Jane O'Connor, Patricia Reilly Giff, Jean Marzollo and Amy Hest. She has also written and illustrated several of her own books including Uncle Willie and the Soup Kitchen, City Green, A Castle on Viola Street, and The Sloppy Copy Slipup. She received a Congressional Commendation from the State of New Jersey for Grandpa's Corner Store and the Irma S. and James H. Black Award for A Dog Like Jack.

(Bowker Author Biography)


DyAnne DiSalvo-Ryan graduated from the School of Visual Arts in New York. She is an author and illustrator of more than forty picture books for children. She has illustrated books written by Beverly Cleary, Mary Pope Osborne, Jean Fritz, Jane O'Connor, Patricia Reilly Giff, Jean Marzollo and Amy Hest. She has also written and illustrated several of her own books including Uncle Willie and the Soup Kitchen, City Green, A Castle on Viola Street, and The Sloppy Copy Slipup. She received a Congressional Commendation from the State of New Jersey for Grandpa's Corner Store and the Irma S. and James H. Black Award for A Dog Like Jack.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 4

Booklist Review

Gr. 2-4. Based on the actual volunteer experience of the author, this picture book provides a look into the soup kitchen without an overly sentimental view of the hungry or a dose of pessimism for the reader. It carefully presents the facts, cushioned between vignettes of the young, curious narrator playing with his elderly Uncle Willie. Theirs is a genuine relationship that softens the subject matter and makes the book successful. Brown-toned watercolors and color pencil drawings show the bare but well-lit atmosphere of the kitchen and the altruism of the cooks who work there everyday. And the illustrations make apparent the large number of hungry people visiting the kitchen, as well as the realistic complaints these people have about life. With a note about soup kitchens introducing the story, this is informative and new, but not scary. ~--Kathryn LaBarbera


School Library Journal Review

Gr 1-3-- If good intentions made great picture books, this would be a winner. A young boy accompanies his after-school companion, Uncle Willie, to a city soup kitchen where Willie works daily. In a ``bed-to-bed'' manner of storytelling, readers are informed of the operation of the soup kitchen as the unnamed boy assumes the role of helper and narrator. There are some discrepancies in the text. How could the steaming soup pots on the stove ``make the whole place smell delicious'' before any of the ingredients have been added? If the soup kitchen is ``small and bright,'' how does it hold 125 people? These inconsistencies, however, are not so much of a drawback as the didactic tone. The competent pictures in soft pastels are sufficient to tell much of the story, but the long, repetitive text makes this book difficult to use as a read-aloud for story hours. Although this seems to be an accurate picture of a topic that is certainly of current concern, the format suggests a younger audience than the one for whom the subject matter would be most interesting and relevant. --Martha Rosen, Edgewood School, Scarsdale, NY (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Booklist Review

Gr. 2-4. Based on the actual volunteer experience of the author, this picture book provides a look into the soup kitchen without an overly sentimental view of the hungry or a dose of pessimism for the reader. It carefully presents the facts, cushioned between vignettes of the young, curious narrator playing with his elderly Uncle Willie. Theirs is a genuine relationship that softens the subject matter and makes the book successful. Brown-toned watercolors and color pencil drawings show the bare but well-lit atmosphere of the kitchen and the altruism of the cooks who work there everyday. And the illustrations make apparent the large number of hungry people visiting the kitchen, as well as the realistic complaints these people have about life. With a note about soup kitchens introducing the story, this is informative and new, but not scary. ~--Kathryn LaBarbera


School Library Journal Review

Gr 1-3-- If good intentions made great picture books, this would be a winner. A young boy accompanies his after-school companion, Uncle Willie, to a city soup kitchen where Willie works daily. In a ``bed-to-bed'' manner of storytelling, readers are informed of the operation of the soup kitchen as the unnamed boy assumes the role of helper and narrator. There are some discrepancies in the text. How could the steaming soup pots on the stove ``make the whole place smell delicious'' before any of the ingredients have been added? If the soup kitchen is ``small and bright,'' how does it hold 125 people? These inconsistencies, however, are not so much of a drawback as the didactic tone. The competent pictures in soft pastels are sufficient to tell much of the story, but the long, repetitive text makes this book difficult to use as a read-aloud for story hours. Although this seems to be an accurate picture of a topic that is certainly of current concern, the format suggests a younger audience than the one for whom the subject matter would be most interesting and relevant. --Martha Rosen, Edgewood School, Scarsdale, NY (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.