Cover image for The new thinking fan's guide to baseball
Title:
The new thinking fan's guide to baseball
Author:
Koppett, Leonard.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Simon & Schuster, [1991]

©1991
Physical Description:
379 pages ; 24 cm
General Note:
"A Fireside book."

Rev. ed. of: A thinking man's guide to baseball. 1967.
Language:
English
Subject Term:
ISBN:
9780671732059

9780671683306
Format :
Book

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On Order

Reviews 6

Booklist Review

First published in 1965 and out of print for 15 years, Koppett's tome reappears, revised and updated with 75 percent new material. Neither a mere statistical treatise nor a collection of recycled anecdotes, this is a guide to enhance one's enjoyment of the game. With effortless style, Koppett reveals easily overlooked subtleties about such obvious topics as pitching, hitting, fielding, baserunning, the field, the umpires, the media's role, and league expansion. Readers will thank Koppett for making the already enjoyable experience of watching the game even better. A wonderful baseball book that cannot be praised too highly. ~--Wes Lukowsky


Publisher's Weekly Review

An updated, rewritten version of the 1967 baseball classic, A Thinking Man's Guide to Baseball , this book by New York Times national edition columnist Koppett delivers what its title promises: a challenging, thoughtful discourse on a sport that, for the true fan, cannot be overanalyzed. Drawing on his decades of baseball reporting (since the days the Dodgers and Giants called New York home) and countless interviews with players, managers and others, the author addresses all facets of the game--from elements of play on the field to ``behind the scenes'' subjects, including, significantly, lawyers and agents. Often, the less obvious topics are most compelling, such as the chapter on signs and his argument that managers ``who have great effect on any given game are the exceptional ones.''p. 113 In a typical fascinating observation, he points out that the average playing field has 90,000 square feet of fair territory. Throughout Koppett provides historical perspective and shows that the ``changeless'' game has always changed and continues to change. Reading this is the fan's equivalent of players' spring training. (Mar.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Library Journal Review

Since publication of Koppett's The Thinking Man's Guide ( LJ 8/67), baseball has added six major league teams, artificial turf, designated hitters, and other changes--for better or worse. Koppett, columnist for the New York Times , examines these innovations in a nuts-and-bolts, good-humored approach, telling fans how to watch, score, and appreciate the game and its history. Recommended for all popular sports collections. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Booklist Review

First published in 1965 and out of print for 15 years, Koppett's tome reappears, revised and updated with 75 percent new material. Neither a mere statistical treatise nor a collection of recycled anecdotes, this is a guide to enhance one's enjoyment of the game. With effortless style, Koppett reveals easily overlooked subtleties about such obvious topics as pitching, hitting, fielding, baserunning, the field, the umpires, the media's role, and league expansion. Readers will thank Koppett for making the already enjoyable experience of watching the game even better. A wonderful baseball book that cannot be praised too highly. ~--Wes Lukowsky


Publisher's Weekly Review

An updated, rewritten version of the 1967 baseball classic, A Thinking Man's Guide to Baseball , this book by New York Times national edition columnist Koppett delivers what its title promises: a challenging, thoughtful discourse on a sport that, for the true fan, cannot be overanalyzed. Drawing on his decades of baseball reporting (since the days the Dodgers and Giants called New York home) and countless interviews with players, managers and others, the author addresses all facets of the game--from elements of play on the field to ``behind the scenes'' subjects, including, significantly, lawyers and agents. Often, the less obvious topics are most compelling, such as the chapter on signs and his argument that managers ``who have great effect on any given game are the exceptional ones.''p. 113 In a typical fascinating observation, he points out that the average playing field has 90,000 square feet of fair territory. Throughout Koppett provides historical perspective and shows that the ``changeless'' game has always changed and continues to change. Reading this is the fan's equivalent of players' spring training. (Mar.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Library Journal Review

Since publication of Koppett's The Thinking Man's Guide ( LJ 8/67), baseball has added six major league teams, artificial turf, designated hitters, and other changes--for better or worse. Koppett, columnist for the New York Times , examines these innovations in a nuts-and-bolts, good-humored approach, telling fans how to watch, score, and appreciate the game and its history. Recommended for all popular sports collections. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.