Cover image for Bringing new products to market : the art and science of creating winners
Title:
Bringing new products to market : the art and science of creating winners
Author:
Hall, John A. (John Alan), 1932-
Publication Information:
New York : American Management Association, [1991]

©1991
Physical Description:
xvi, 248 pages ; 24 cm
Language:
English
Subject Term:
ISBN:
9780814450178
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library HF5415.153 .H36 1991 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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Summary

Summary

Tells the stories of thirty-six successful and unsuccessful new product introductions, and offers advice on market research.


Reviews 2

Library Journal Review

This informative, entertaining book looks at the variables that make for a new product's success or failure. The 36 mini-case histories look at winners--Cabbage Patch Kids, McDonald's Japan, Xerox copiers--and losers--New Coke, Pringles, Psychedelic Sunscreen. Hall, head of a management consulting firm that specializes in market planning and research, also tells how to plan product strategy, conduct market research, decide on pricing and names, and integrate new product planning into overall company planning. Each section concludes with ``Winning Ideas'' that summarize the points illustrated. Like Michael Gershman's Getting It Right the Second Time ( LJ 9/1/90), this book will help all marketers, students, and researchers. Recommended for all business collections.-- Susan Awe, Natrona Cty. P.L., Casper, Wy. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Choice Review

This insightful, practical little guide to streetwise marketing is a useful tool for the reader who is versed in the parlance of product development and planning. It is, therefore, recommended for students who have taken marketing courses, or for individuals involved in a small business enterprise or taking small business courses. Hall analyzes the techniques of successful product-to-market campaigns with "mini-sagas" and short discussions of the methods employed. He classifies the sagas into losers or winners. The author's sagas include the RCA debacle with a videodisc player, McDonald's successes, Macmillan's experiences with a baseball encyclopedia, and more. The reading is light, succinct, and enjoyable. Hall has a number of years as a management consultant both in big business and in his own firm, making him a very credible authority on his subject. Strongly recommended for any library with a clientele that seeks a pragmatic approach to business learning.-F. Andrews, Middlesex Community College


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