Cover image for Spare the child : the religious roots of punishment and the psychological impact of physical abuse
Title:
Spare the child : the religious roots of punishment and the psychological impact of physical abuse
Author:
Greven, Philip J.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Knopf : Distributed by Random House, 1991.
Physical Description:
xiv, 263 pages ; 24 cm
General Note:
Includes bibliographical references (p. [223]-248) and index.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780394578606
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Item Holds
Searching...
HQ770.4 .G74 1990 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
Searching...
Searching...
HQ770.4 .G74 1990 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
Searching...

On Order

Reviews 2

Publisher's Weekly Review

Greven marshalls a wealth of clinical evidence to show that beatings and spankings administered in childhood have long-lasting harmful consequences, including suppressed anger, self-hatred, recurring depressions, apathy, and stifling of compassion for oneself and others. A Rutgers history professor who teaches courses on the family, Greven maintains that the violence against children endemic in our society contributes to adults' unquestioning obedience to authority and to the oppression of women. He traces support for physical punishment to the Protestant belief that use of the rod is necessary to break the child's will; he also briefly outlines nonviolent alternatives to corporal punishment. Although this is more sociological treatise than childrearing guide, parents will benefit from this wise and liberating book. (Feb.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Choice Review

How has the practice of physical punishment of children shaped American character and culture, both past and present? What lessons are learned by the child disciplined with fear and pain? In Spare the Child, as the title suggests, Greven (history, Rutgers University) makes a powerful case for abolishing all corporal punishment in disciplining and socializing children. The book explores the history of physical punishment with particular attention to its religious roots. Greven is adamant in opposing the view, held by most Protestant fundamentalist groups, that such punishment is the will of God, carried out by loving parents. The book's three major parts examine, over time, the diverse experiences of children who have been physically punished; the predominant religious, legal, and scientific rationales for using corporal punishment; and finally, the social and political consequences of physical abuse. This impassioned and informed argument for nonviolent child rearing is of interest to a wide variety of audiences. -B. A. Pine, University of Connecticut