Cover image for Breadtime stories
Title:
Breadtime stories
Author:
Cheney, Susan.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Berkeley, CA : Ten Speed Press, [1990]

©1990
Physical Description:
257 pages : illustrations ; 28 cm
General Note:
Includes indexes.
Language:
English
Subject Term:
ISBN:
9780898153163

9780898153156
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Item Holds
Searching...
TX769 .C42 1990 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks-Oversize
Searching...

On Order

Reviews 3

Booklist Review

Cheney, associated with the acclaimed Moosewood Restaurant in Ithaca, New York, includes a fine variety of breads: pancakes, scones, flat breads, crepes, and such classics as sourdough rye, natural-rise oat, and sesame bread. International breads are well represented, and minimal use is made of dairy products. Cheney addresses the relationship between bread making and cooking with three chapters offering ideas for salads, dressings, soups, vegetable dishes, and desserts, all to be served with the hearty and flavorful breads featured in this cookbook. Still another complete course in healthy bread making in the Laurels' Kitchen Bread Book tradition. Glossary; to be indexed. ~--Iva Freeman


Publisher's Weekly Review

Cheney, a former cook at the Moosewood Restaurant in Ithaca, N.Y., offers an array of recipes for breads and baked goods as well as some soups, stews, salads and desserts that will appeal to vegetarians and whole foods cooks. Her approach, which emphasizes teaching and encouraging the reader--she spends 15 pages on the rudiments of handling yeast dough--may reassure beginners. However, businesslike bakers will find the author as cloying as an overdose of organic honey when she writes, for instance, that ``creating natural-rise breads is . . . suspenseful and magical.'' A number of treats, such as poppy-seed bread, buckwheat muffins, and sweet dough for sticky buns, are presented in attractive whole-grain versions. But baffling alterations in classics, such as embellishing piroshki with kuzu powder, tempeh and kelp powder or adding dark barley miso to pesto, are bound to draw grumbles from all but determined whole foods aficionados. Perhaps Cheney should heed the argument she uses to assert the superiority of whole-wheat flour to white: ``If it isn't broken, why fix it?'' This is the author's first cookbook. Line drawings. (Dec.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Library Journal Review

Cheney, an alumna of the renowned Moosewood Restaurant in Ithaca, New York, offers recipes both for breads and for ``companions,'' from spreads and pates to salads and soups. The breads are whole-wheat or whole-grain, and all the recipes are vegetarian and low in fat and cholesterol; some are sophisticated and inventive, others are variations of health food standbys such as tofu burgers. Cheney's first love is baking, and the detailed baking instructions and bread recipes are the best part of the book. For subject collections. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.