Cover image for A dictionary of genetics
Title:
A dictionary of genetics
Author:
King, Robert C.
Personal Author:
Edition:
Fourth edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Oxford University Press, 1990.
Physical Description:
406 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780195063707

9780195063714
Format :
Book

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QH427 .K55 1990 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks-Non circulating
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Summary

Summary

Modern genetics began in 1900 with the rediscovery of Mendel's paper, and now the sequencing of the human genome has brought the first century of progress in this field to a triumphant conclusion. Genetics has entered a new era with the advent of genomic and proteomic approaches, and the knowledge in no other biological discipline is advancing as rapidly as that in molecular genetics and cell biology. Proliferation of new terms inevitably accompanies such exponential growth. The sixth edition of A Dictionary of Genetics addresses the need of students and professionals to have access to an up-to-date reference source that defines not only the most recently coined terms, but in many cases also presents important ancillary encyclopedic information.A Dictionary of Genetics has a broader coverage than its name implies, since it includes definitions of strictly genetic words along with a variety of non-genetic terms often encountered in the literature of genetics. There are about 7,000 definitions, and tables or drawings that illustrate 395 of these. In addition to the main body of the dictionary, this work features new Appendices covering the genomic sizes and gene numbers of about 30 organisms ranging from the smallest known virus to humans, an up-to-date listing of internet addresses for easy access to genetic databanks, and a list of developments, inventions and advances in genetics, cytology, and evolutionary science from the past 400 years. These 900 entries, covering a period from 1590 to 2001, are also cross-referenced in the definitions that occur in the body of the dictionary. No other genetics dictionary supplies definitions cross-referenced to chronology entries or has species entries cross-referenced to an appendix showing the position of each organism in a taxonomic hierarchy. These features make A Dictionary of Genetics the most important lexicon in this field.


Summary

Genetics is one of the most rapidly advancing of the life sciences. This growth is accompanied by a proliferation in terminology, which constitutes a problem to the student and professional alike. Many of the words, especially those from molecular genetics, are newly coined. Other words,like those used in quantitative genetics or mutational studies, are from non-biological fields, such as statistics or physics. The text and journal reader is referred to the scientific names of species and genera, often without knowing whether the organism is a grass, an insect, or a rodent. Thefourth edition of Dictionary of Genetics, containing more than 6,000 entries, will continue to be the definitive reference for students of classical and molecular genetics. In addition to the most current account of terminology available, this edition includes four newly updated appendices giving achronology of events bearing on genetics, a list of professional journals, a classification of organisms, and a list of domesticated species.


Author Notes

Robert C. King is Professor of Biology, Northwestern University
William D. Stanfield is Professor of Biology. California Polytechnic State University


Robert C. King is Professor of Biology, Northwestern University
William D. Stanfield is Professor of Biology. California Polytechnic State University


Reviews 4

Library Journal Review

A source for identifying specialized terminology is essential to keeping up with any growing field of research. This dictionary admirably satisfies that need, drawing from genetics and other related disciplines. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Choice Review

This fourth edition updates a dependable compendium first appearing in 1968 and last published in 1985 (2nd ed., CH, Sep'75). King and Stansfield (Northwestern and California Polytechnic State universities, respectively) state that 20 of the now 7,100 definitions are new or revised. Illustrations number 250 and cross-references are ample. A good explanation for the order of entries is given. The appendix material is interesting, particularly the chronology. Events of 1984-1989 have been added and some earlier entries deleted. Further readings are indicated in the bibliography. There is a handy list of non-English equivalents of words often seen in scientific titles, e.g., "proceedings," "transactions," "yearbook." Legibility is good, although the change to a two-column per page layout is no improvement. Norman Maclean's Dictionary of Genetics & Cell Biology (CH, Sep'88), with its longer and less technical definitions better suits general readers. Genetics is an active area of research and sources updating terminology are essential. A useful and needed work for upper-division undergraduates through advanced researchers in genetics and related topics. L. Bronars Yale University


Library Journal Review

A source for identifying specialized terminology is essential to keeping up with any growing field of research. This dictionary admirably satisfies that need, drawing from genetics and other related disciplines. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Choice Review

This fourth edition updates a dependable compendium first appearing in 1968 and last published in 1985 (2nd ed., CH, Sep'75). King and Stansfield (Northwestern and California Polytechnic State universities, respectively) state that 20 of the now 7,100 definitions are new or revised. Illustrations number 250 and cross-references are ample. A good explanation for the order of entries is given. The appendix material is interesting, particularly the chronology. Events of 1984-1989 have been added and some earlier entries deleted. Further readings are indicated in the bibliography. There is a handy list of non-English equivalents of words often seen in scientific titles, e.g., "proceedings," "transactions," "yearbook." Legibility is good, although the change to a two-column per page layout is no improvement. Norman Maclean's Dictionary of Genetics & Cell Biology (CH, Sep'88), with its longer and less technical definitions better suits general readers. Genetics is an active area of research and sources updating terminology are essential. A useful and needed work for upper-division undergraduates through advanced researchers in genetics and related topics. L. Bronars Yale University


Table of Contents

A Dictionary of Geneticsp. 3
Appendix A
Classificationp. 371
Appendix B
Domesticated Speciesp. 377
Appendix C
Chronologyp. 380
Index of Scientists Listed in the Chronologyp. 409
Bibliographyp. 419
Appendix D
Periodicals Cited in the Literaturep. 422
Multijournal Publishersp. 435
Foreign Words Commonly Found in Scientific Titlesp. 437
Appendix E
Genetic Databasesp. 439
A Dictionary of Geneticsp. 3
Appendix A
Classificationp. 371
Appendix B
Domesticated Speciesp. 377
Appendix C
Chronologyp. 380
Index of Scientists Listed in the Chronologyp. 409
Bibliographyp. 419
Appendix D
Periodicals Cited in the Literaturep. 422
Multijournal Publishersp. 435
Foreign Words Commonly Found in Scientific Titlesp. 437
Appendix E
Genetic Databasesp. 439