Cover image for Reaching for infinity : puzzles, paradoxes and brainteasers #3
Title:
Reaching for infinity : puzzles, paradoxes and brainteasers #3
Author:
Gibilisco, Stan.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
Blue Ridge Summit, PA : TAB Books, [1990]

©1990
Physical Description:
xi, 127 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780830683277

9780830633272
Format :
Book

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QA95 .G484 1990 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Author Notes

Stan Gibilisco is the author of several important scientific books, including Understanding Einstein's Theory of Relativity and Teach Yourself Electricity and Electronics. While his primary interests are in technical and scientific fields, his passion has always been writing. He has worked as vice president of an electronic company and explains the exciting field of electronics in clear and complete terms.

Gibilisco was born on September 26, 1953 in Birmingham, Ala. and educated at the University of Minnesota.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Stan Gibilisco is the author of several important scientific books, including Understanding Einstein's Theory of Relativity and Teach Yourself Electricity and Electronics. While his primary interests are in technical and scientific fields, his passion has always been writing. He has worked as vice president of an electronic company and explains the exciting field of electronics in clear and complete terms.

Gibilisco was born on September 26, 1953 in Birmingham, Ala. and educated at the University of Minnesota.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 2

Choice Review

Gibilisco's book excels in its ability "to arouse curiosity and provoke thought" about the infinite without duplicating the large body of literature about the subject. First, the author explores the infinite in a physical context: unbounded space and time, hyperuniverses, the size hierarchy of particles in the cosmos, and the paradoxes of homogeneity and quantization. Then, he explores the infinite in a number-theoretic context: arithmetics of transfinite numbers, the continuum hypothesis, the arithmetic of infinite ordinals, division by zero, and the representation of the infinite on Euclidean and non-Euclidean surfaces. Readers will be easily captivated by Gibilisco's creative introduction of black holes, graph distortions on squashed xy-planes, "infinigons," "infinihedrons," infinite angles, and a finite-yet-infinite binary tree. Unfortunately, as these fascinating ideas involving the infinite are only introduced, readers are left to more detailed explorations on their own. The reference list for further reading should have included more than five books. Highly recommended for lower-division undergraduates who like to add new twists to their senses of reality. J. Johnson Western Washington University


Choice Review

Gibilisco's book excels in its ability "to arouse curiosity and provoke thought" about the infinite without duplicating the large body of literature about the subject. First, the author explores the infinite in a physical context: unbounded space and time, hyperuniverses, the size hierarchy of particles in the cosmos, and the paradoxes of homogeneity and quantization. Then, he explores the infinite in a number-theoretic context: arithmetics of transfinite numbers, the continuum hypothesis, the arithmetic of infinite ordinals, division by zero, and the representation of the infinite on Euclidean and non-Euclidean surfaces. Readers will be easily captivated by Gibilisco's creative introduction of black holes, graph distortions on squashed xy-planes, "infinigons," "infinihedrons," infinite angles, and a finite-yet-infinite binary tree. Unfortunately, as these fascinating ideas involving the infinite are only introduced, readers are left to more detailed explorations on their own. The reference list for further reading should have included more than five books. Highly recommended for lower-division undergraduates who like to add new twists to their senses of reality. J. Johnson Western Washington University