Cover image for Lasers : humanity's magic light
Title:
Lasers : humanity's magic light
Author:
Nardo, Don, 1947-
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
San Diego, CA : Lucent Books, [1990]

©1990
Physical Description:
96 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 27 cm.
Summary:
Discusses the history of lasers and their uses in such fields as medicine, entertainment, and the military.
Language:
English
Subject Term:
ISBN:
9781560062004
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library TA1682 .N37 1990 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Central Library TA1682 .N37 1990 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

Discusses the history of lasers and their uses in such fields as medicine, entertainment, and the military.


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

Gr. 6-10. Written for the Encyclopedia of Discovery and Invention series, this book looks at the history and development of the laser as well as its application in many fields, including manufacturing, communications, commerce, medicine, entertainment, and the military. Nardo also discusses its potential role in the future production of energy through nuclear fusion or space-based solar collection. Well organized and clearly written, the book provides an up-to-date summary of the subject, enlivened by some excellent color photographs as well as many black-and-white photos and diagrams. No notes, but a glossary, a bibliography, a list of further readings, and an index are appended. ~--Carolyn Phelan


School Library Journal Review

Gr 6-9-- An introduction to the developments and uses of lasers. Nardo begins with a history of the discovery of the laser phenomenon that includes the battle over patent rights. Subsequent chapters are devoted to a contemporary application of lasers--in the military, in communications, in compact-disc players, for welding and cutting, in medicine, and even as entertainment. The writing style is breezy and appropriately gee-whizzy, although the technical explanations tend to be vague. High quality photos appear throughout; simple graphics are employed in the technical sections, usually boxed off from the main text. Overall, Nardo has provided a nice introduction to the best known applications of lasers. Some of the newest applications (such as single molecule detection, gene sequencing, and detection of very short-lived events) are regrettably missing. However, there is enough here to arouse young readers' interest. --Alan Newman, American Chemical Society, Washington, D.C. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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