Cover image for The dramatic landscape of Steinbeck's short stories
Title:
The dramatic landscape of Steinbeck's short stories
Author:
Timmerman, John H.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
Norman : University of Oklahoma Press, [1990]

©1990
Physical Description:
xvii, 333 pages : portrait ; 23 cm
Language:
English
Genre:
ISBN:
9780806122588
Format :
Book

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Library
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PS3537.T34 Z927 1990 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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PS3537.T34 Z927 1990 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks-Non circulating
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PS3537.T34 Z927 1990 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

Making extensive use of Steinbeck's notebooks and ledgers in examining the entire body of the writer's short stories in their chronological development, this study examines the decade that began while Steinbeck was a writer at Stanford, and continues through 1934, when Steinbeck drafted the stories of "The Long Valley" collection. Annotation(c) 2003 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)


Reviews 1

Choice Review

Beginning with Steinbeck's urge to write in the 1920s, this analysis moves to the 1930s and a "developing sense of craft" in symbolism, attentiveness to the rhythms of language, and an overall "sureness of touch." The provenance of stories in The Pastures of Heaven (1932), which are grouped and studied by themes, is followed by a concentration on the "organic structural unity" within The Red Pony (1937). A full turn about three independent fictions, "Foothills Around the Long Valley," precedes attention to the collection The Long Valley (1938) in terms of patterns of imagery, narrative perspectives, and thematic patterns. These stories are treated individually, or under the rubrics "The Artist in Conflict" and "The Teleological Point of View." Here as elsewhere, factual background are adduced, with the method of plot summary plus ongoing commentary. Steinbeck's chronology, revision, experimentation, and mastery are addressed, as is prior criticism. Timmerman is a touch florid and rhetorical at first; some analyses make Steinbeck read as unsubtly mannered or schematic. But even if this critic is slightly worshipful and his conclusion lush, he is wonderfully thorough and responsive. With notes, an appendix describing the notebooks, and a particularly helpful bibliography, this study is recommended to upper-level undergraduate and graduate attention. -L. K. MacKendrick, University of Windsor