Cover image for Days and memory
Title:
Days and memory
Author:
Delbo, Charlotte.
Personal Author:
Uniform Title:
Mémoire et les jours. English
Edition:
First English-language edition.
Publication Information:
Marlboro, Vt. : Marlboro Press, [1990]

©1990
Physical Description:
ix, 122 pages ; 22 cm
General Note:
Translation of: La mémoire et les jours.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780910395557
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library PQ2664.E5117 M413 1990 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

In Auschwitz, memory meant life: remembering the humanity extinguished by the death camps and hoping to survive to tell what had been endured. Charlotte Delbo, a non-Jew sent to Auschwitz for being a member of the French resistance movement, recalls the poems, vignettes, and meditations that fed her companions' spirits, interweaving her experiences with the sufferings of others and depicting dignity and decency in the face of inhumanity.


Author Notes

Charlotte Delbo was traveling in South America when she learned of the fall of France to the Nazis. Upon returning home, she and her husband were imprisoned by the Gestapo. After the murder of her husband, Delbo was held for nine months before being deported to Auschwitz in January 1943. She was in her seventies when she died in 1985. Days and Memory, published posthumously, appeared as La mémoire et les jours later that same year.


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

French author and playwright Delbo, who died in 1985 in her 70s, was a survivor of Auschwitz. That experience is central to all her writings. In this, her final book--a posthumously published collection of poems and vignettes translated from the French--Delbo exquisitely articulates the horror of the Holocaust so that we can understand it without (as in history books) being repulsed. Memory, as the title indicates, is the theme that ties these beautifully crafted pieces together. The author reveals memory at work on two levels: the personal (the memory of one's former self, which preserves human dignity and enables one literally to survive) and the collective (memory as a storehouse of recollections to be handed down to and preserved by future generations). Deeply affecting, these imagistic works carry Delbo's impressions not only of the concentration camps, but also of oppression in Greece, Spain, and Argentina in the decades following World War II--yet other reminders of still rampant inhumanity. Delbo's book ranks among the best of the literature of the Holocaust. --Mary Banas


Publisher's Weekly Review

After France fell to the Germans during WW II, Delbo and her husband, Communist and Resistance leader Georges Dudach, were imprisoned. Dudach was shot and killed, and Delbo was sent to Auschwitz. Days and Memory , originally published in France soon after the author's death in 1985, is a testimony of atrocities experienced and witnessed by Delbo in the concentration camp and includes stories recounted by others of suffering borne both during and after the war. Delbo ( None of Us Will Return ) is an objective interpreter of these horrors, allowing the scenes to speak for themselves, yet grief and sorrow are palpable on every page. Unforgettable is the sketch in which a woman, called out of the barracks during the night by the roll-call siren, searches desperately with the help of other women to locate her galoshes in the snow, while the barracks leader swings at them with her club. The most harrowing piece commemorates the mass execution of all of the men in a Greek village by the Germans in 1943 and the women who must find a burial place for 1300 bodies. (Aug.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Table of Contents

PrefaceRosette Lamont
I
II
III
IV
V
VI
VII
VIII
IX
X Tomb of the Dictator
XI
XII
XIII Warsaw
XIV
XV
XVI
XVII
XVIII The Madwomen of May
XVIV Kalavrita of the Thousand Antigones
XX
XXI
XXII
XXIII

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