Cover image for Raymond Williams, writing, culture, politics
Title:
Raymond Williams, writing, culture, politics
Author:
O'Connor, Alan.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Oxford, UK ; New York, NY, USA : Basil Blackwell, 1989.
Physical Description:
xi, 180 pages ; 24 cm
General Note:
Includes index.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780631165880

9780631165897
Format :
Book

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PR6073.I4329 Z85 1989 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks-Non circulating
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Reviews 2

Choice Review

Raymond Williams (d. 1988) was one of the truly significant politico-intellectual figures in postwar Britain, a committed and humane socialist whose work in the field of criticism represents a model to be emulated by leftist thinkers throughout the English-speaking world. In this brief study, O'Connor succeeds in elucidating the sociocultural and historical contexts within which Williams's work and ideas have emerged, and in separating out for discrete analysis some of the threads that make up the distinctive and layered web of Williams's understanding. These include the concepts of "knowable community," "complex seeing," and "structure of feeling." As Terry Eagleton points out in his abbreviated but penetrating foreword, Williams's work is marked by its insistence on complexity, relationality, and heterogeneity. Useful though O'Connor's general commentary is, his book will be turned to most frequently for its superb, extended bibliography of writings by and about Williams. A useful acquisition for students at graduate and upper-division undergraduate levels. N. F. Lazarus Brown University


Choice Review

Raymond Williams (d. 1988) was one of the truly significant politico-intellectual figures in postwar Britain, a committed and humane socialist whose work in the field of criticism represents a model to be emulated by leftist thinkers throughout the English-speaking world. In this brief study, O'Connor succeeds in elucidating the sociocultural and historical contexts within which Williams's work and ideas have emerged, and in separating out for discrete analysis some of the threads that make up the distinctive and layered web of Williams's understanding. These include the concepts of "knowable community," "complex seeing," and "structure of feeling." As Terry Eagleton points out in his abbreviated but penetrating foreword, Williams's work is marked by its insistence on complexity, relationality, and heterogeneity. Useful though O'Connor's general commentary is, his book will be turned to most frequently for its superb, extended bibliography of writings by and about Williams. A useful acquisition for students at graduate and upper-division undergraduate levels. N. F. Lazarus Brown University