Cover image for Mr. Mojo risin' : Jim Morrison, the last holy fool
Title:
Mr. Mojo risin' : Jim Morrison, the last holy fool
Author:
Dalton, David.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : St. Martin's Press, [1991]
Physical Description:
160 pages ; 28 cm
Language:
English
Personal Subject:
ISBN:
9780312059002

9780312058999
Format :
Book

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ML420.M62 D3 1991 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks-Oversize Non-Circ
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ML420.M62 D3 1991 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Summary

Summary

Jim Morrison, the Lizard King, was a Renaissance statue come to life with the body of an adolescent god mailed in leather. He embodied the hallucinated, under-the-volcano neon black vision of L.A. like no one else. Like a prophet from the wilderness made king, he was ultimately trapped and never made it back from the other side.


Summary

Jim Morrison, the Lizard King, was a Renaissance statue come to life with the body of an adolescent god mailed in leather. He embodied the hallucinated, under-the-volcano neon black vision of L.A. like no one else. Like a prophet from the wilderness made king, he was ultimately trapped and never made it back from the other side.


Author Notes

Born in Newark & schooled in his father's bar, Nick Tosches is one of the most original & individualistic writers at work today. He is the author of acclaimed biographies of Sonny Liston, (The Devil & Sonny Liston), Dean Martin (Dino), the Mafia financier Michele Sindona (Power on Earth), & Jerry Lee Lewis (Hellfire); of several books about popular music (Country & Unsung Heroes of Rock 'n' Roll); & of the novels "Trinities" & "Cut Numbers". Thirty years of his writing was recently collected into "The Nick Tosches Reader" (Da Capo). He is a contributing editor of "Vanity Fair". He lives in New York City, & his poetry readings are legend.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 2

Library Journal Review

Just 15 years before Morrison and his band the Doors set aflame the late 1960s rock scene, Enyalois , an ancient god of destruction described in hermetic scripts, reemerged in academic discussions. According to Rolling Stone contributor Dalton, the mythic Morrison, driven by whiskey demons and acid-laced visions of glory, seemed an avatar of this god whose name, loosely translated, meant ``to render unto nothingness.'' Likewise, Dalton pictures Morrison as the embodiment of a tradition of doomed artists that includes Beat generation poets as well as modernist poets Arthur Rimbaud and Charles Baudelaire. Now 20 years after Morrison's death, Dalton discusses the two most interesting aspects of the so-called ``Lizard King's'' existence: his varied and lurid influences, and his original intention that the Doors be a performance art-based band. Doors fans will clamor for this original treatment, although Dalton's description of Morrison's demise is ordinary grist for the mill. Another recent book on Morrison is Dylan Jones's Dark Star (LJ 3/1/91).--Ed.-- Lauren Bielski, New York (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Library Journal Review

Just 15 years before Morrison and his band the Doors set aflame the late 1960s rock scene, Enyalois , an ancient god of destruction described in hermetic scripts, reemerged in academic discussions. According to Rolling Stone contributor Dalton, the mythic Morrison, driven by whiskey demons and acid-laced visions of glory, seemed an avatar of this god whose name, loosely translated, meant ``to render unto nothingness.'' Likewise, Dalton pictures Morrison as the embodiment of a tradition of doomed artists that includes Beat generation poets as well as modernist poets Arthur Rimbaud and Charles Baudelaire. Now 20 years after Morrison's death, Dalton discusses the two most interesting aspects of the so-called ``Lizard King's'' existence: his varied and lurid influences, and his original intention that the Doors be a performance art-based band. Doors fans will clamor for this original treatment, although Dalton's description of Morrison's demise is ordinary grist for the mill. Another recent book on Morrison is Dylan Jones's Dark Star (LJ 3/1/91).--Ed.-- Lauren Bielski, New York (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.