Cover image for Arkansas mammals : their natural history, classification, and distribution
Title:
Arkansas mammals : their natural history, classification, and distribution
Author:
Sealander, John A., 1917-
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Fayetteville : University of Arkansas Press, [1990]

©1990
Physical Description:
xiv, 308 pages : illustrations ; 26 cm
General Note:
Includes index.
Language:
English
Subject Term:
Added Author:
ISBN:
9781557281029

9781557281036
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library QL719.A8 S43 1990 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks-Non circulating
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Summary

Summary

Heavily illustrated with color photographs, Arkansas Mammals is the comprehensive guide to the state's mammal population. Endangered or threatened species of mammals, along with non-native species that have become an important part of the fauna in Arkansas and adjacent states are discussed.


Summary

Heavily illustrated with color photographs, Arkansas Mammals is the comprehensive guide to the state's mammal population. Endangered or threatened species of mammals and missing species known to have been present in recent times are discussed, along with non-native species that have become an important part of the mammal fauna in Arkansas and adjacent states.


Reviews 2

Choice Review

Sealander and Heidt (University of Arkansas) have produced a felicitous revision and expansion of Sealander's Arkansas Mammals (1979). Aimed at professional biologists, college or high school students, and general readers with no formal training in zoology, this book provides descriptions of the "71 naturally occurring wild mammals" in Arkansas. There is also discussion of five species of unverified occurrence and brief mention of a number of prehistoric and extirpated mammals. In addition, there are sections on past geological and climatic conditions, present physical and biotic features of the state, endangered and threatened species, and the geographic affinities of Arkansas mammals. For each species, there are discussions of nomenclature, identification and description, Arkansas distribution and abundance, life history, importance and/or management, and references. There are color photos of each species, many of them particularly effective, together with drawings of skulls and distributional maps. The keys to species are full and clear, with sketches illustrating important distinguishing skull characteristics. The authors have not attempted detailed explication of subspecific differences. A glossary and explanatory drawings that show the features of representative mammal skulls and selected mammal tracks and droppings add to the value of the work. The bibliography, although selective, is representative. A model of its kind, highly recommended for all readers from junior high school on up. K. B. Sterling Pace University


Choice Review

Sealander and Heidt (University of Arkansas) have produced a felicitous revision and expansion of Sealander's Arkansas Mammals (1979). Aimed at professional biologists, college or high school students, and general readers with no formal training in zoology, this book provides descriptions of the "71 naturally occurring wild mammals" in Arkansas. There is also discussion of five species of unverified occurrence and brief mention of a number of prehistoric and extirpated mammals. In addition, there are sections on past geological and climatic conditions, present physical and biotic features of the state, endangered and threatened species, and the geographic affinities of Arkansas mammals. For each species, there are discussions of nomenclature, identification and description, Arkansas distribution and abundance, life history, importance and/or management, and references. There are color photos of each species, many of them particularly effective, together with drawings of skulls and distributional maps. The keys to species are full and clear, with sketches illustrating important distinguishing skull characteristics. The authors have not attempted detailed explication of subspecific differences. A glossary and explanatory drawings that show the features of representative mammal skulls and selected mammal tracks and droppings add to the value of the work. The bibliography, although selective, is representative. A model of its kind, highly recommended for all readers from junior high school on up. K. B. Sterling Pace University


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