Cover image for Blood in the face : the Ku Klux Klan, Aryan nations, Nazi skinheads, and the rise of a new white culture
Title:
Blood in the face : the Ku Klux Klan, Aryan nations, Nazi skinheads, and the rise of a new white culture
Author:
Ridgeway, James, 1936-
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Thunder's Mouth Press, [1990]

©1990
Physical Description:
203 pages ; 25 cm
Language:
English
ISBN:
9781560250029

9781560250036
Format :
Book

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E184.A1 R482 1990 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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E184.A1 R482 1990 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks-Non circulating
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Summary

Summary

A pipe bomb in Seattle ... an armored car hijacking in California ... the high-stepping stomp of slam-dancing skinheads in Dallas ... & the bullet-ridden body of a talk show host in Denver. These are the harbingers of a new American culture-a culture that is "tight, right, & white." Blood in the Face is the first book to expose the racist far-right movements of America & Europe-movements whose participants range from armed underground extremists to mainstream lobbyists & state legislators. It tells their story from the inside out, in interviews, photos, recruiting pamphlets, cartoons, rants, sermons, threats, police reports, & famous last words before the final shootouts. Village Voice political correspondent James Ridgeway highlights the words & artifacts of the racist far right, & details the movement's volatile history & rapid expansion in the last decade, making Blood in the Face the most current & comprehensive survey to date of a culture that is too powerful-and too much a part of American culture-to be ignored or dismissed.


Summary

Exposing the racist far-right movements of America and Europe, this book tells the story from the inside out in interviews, recruitment pamphlets, sermons, threats, and police reports. A new section examines the Oklahoma city bombing and the current militia movements.


Reviews 6

Booklist Review

This brief history of primarily American racist organizations begins with the Ku Klux Klan shortly after the Civil War and ends with the Posse Comitatus, Aryan Nation, and Nazi Skinheads in the news today. The Washington correspondent for the Village Voice gives organization leaders, schisms, and internecine disputes (e.g., a Louisiana Kleagle accusing David Duke of "conduct unbecoming a racist") precedence over evocation of the racist's delight in burning human flesh. So he does not compile statistics of lynchings, and the dramatic events he narrates, like the 1984 robbery of a Brinks truck by the Order (an offshoot of the Aryan Nation), are tinged by the adventure that makes folk heroes. Fortunately, such heroizing is counterbalanced by the many genuinely unnerving photo~graphs, cartoons, and pamphlets Ridgeway reprints in the heavily illustrated volume. In all, a useful resource for racism buffs, if such a readership exists. ~--Roland ~Wulbert


Publisher's Weekly Review

Village Voice correspondent Ridgeway ( Powering Civilization ) traces the evolution of the ``racialist right'' in American politics up to George Bush's bid for the presidency, which, the author asserts, had the issue of race at its very foundation. With startling detail, this volume sets forth the violent histories of such organizations as the Ku Klux Klan, founded in 1866 by six former Confederate soldiers; the John Birch Society, an anti-civil rights group masquerading as an anti-Communist force; and the Posse Comitatus, whose members gather in posses to ``protect'' the white race from the scourge of Jews, blacks and other minorities. Examining their influence on the political climate of the U.S., Ridgeway profiles such leaders as David Dukes, the former head of the Knights of the Ku Klux Klan in Louisiana who ran for the Senate in 1990. Readers may feel overwhelmed by the amount of information this fascinating book imparts, and less than smooth transitions give the work a scattered feeling. As a result, Ridgeway's conclusions--including the obvious one that with the Cold War over, race will increasingly define ``the social contours of society''--are more general than incisive. Illustrated. (Feb.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Library Journal Review

Ridgeway has written a series of compelling reports in the Village Voice on the extreme right in contemporary America, and on the impact of radical racist and anti-Semitic groups on mainstream politics and culture. The articles are here rewritten to present a comprehensive view of racist politics in the United States (with some reference to Western European politics). However, in the book Ridgeway relies on purple prose, unsubstantiated analysis, and superficial background, so the vivid details and acute perspective of the original reports are obscured. Read instead the Voice articles, or James Corcoran's Bitter Harvest: Gordon Kahl and the Posse Comitatus in the Heartland ( LJ 3/1/90).--Timothy Christenfeld, Columbia Univ. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Booklist Review

This brief history of primarily American racist organizations begins with the Ku Klux Klan shortly after the Civil War and ends with the Posse Comitatus, Aryan Nation, and Nazi Skinheads in the news today. The Washington correspondent for the Village Voice gives organization leaders, schisms, and internecine disputes (e.g., a Louisiana Kleagle accusing David Duke of "conduct unbecoming a racist") precedence over evocation of the racist's delight in burning human flesh. So he does not compile statistics of lynchings, and the dramatic events he narrates, like the 1984 robbery of a Brinks truck by the Order (an offshoot of the Aryan Nation), are tinged by the adventure that makes folk heroes. Fortunately, such heroizing is counterbalanced by the many genuinely unnerving photo~graphs, cartoons, and pamphlets Ridgeway reprints in the heavily illustrated volume. In all, a useful resource for racism buffs, if such a readership exists. ~--Roland ~Wulbert


Publisher's Weekly Review

Village Voice correspondent Ridgeway ( Powering Civilization ) traces the evolution of the ``racialist right'' in American politics up to George Bush's bid for the presidency, which, the author asserts, had the issue of race at its very foundation. With startling detail, this volume sets forth the violent histories of such organizations as the Ku Klux Klan, founded in 1866 by six former Confederate soldiers; the John Birch Society, an anti-civil rights group masquerading as an anti-Communist force; and the Posse Comitatus, whose members gather in posses to ``protect'' the white race from the scourge of Jews, blacks and other minorities. Examining their influence on the political climate of the U.S., Ridgeway profiles such leaders as David Dukes, the former head of the Knights of the Ku Klux Klan in Louisiana who ran for the Senate in 1990. Readers may feel overwhelmed by the amount of information this fascinating book imparts, and less than smooth transitions give the work a scattered feeling. As a result, Ridgeway's conclusions--including the obvious one that with the Cold War over, race will increasingly define ``the social contours of society''--are more general than incisive. Illustrated. (Feb.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Library Journal Review

Ridgeway has written a series of compelling reports in the Village Voice on the extreme right in contemporary America, and on the impact of radical racist and anti-Semitic groups on mainstream politics and culture. The articles are here rewritten to present a comprehensive view of racist politics in the United States (with some reference to Western European politics). However, in the book Ridgeway relies on purple prose, unsubstantiated analysis, and superficial background, so the vivid details and acute perspective of the original reports are obscured. Read instead the Voice articles, or James Corcoran's Bitter Harvest: Gordon Kahl and the Posse Comitatus in the Heartland ( LJ 3/1/90).--Timothy Christenfeld, Columbia Univ. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.