Cover image for Working class without work : high school students in a de-industrializing economy
Title:
Working class without work : high school students in a de-industrializing economy
Author:
Weis, Lois.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Routledge, 1990.
Physical Description:
xvi, 240 pages ; 23 cm.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780415900485

9780415902342
Format :
Book

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LC5051 .W4 1990 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

Based primarily on ethnographic data, Working Class Without Work examines the identity formation process among white working-class youth in the context of the de-industrialization of the American economy. The elimination of many basic production jobs and the expansion of the service sector have changed the expectations and opportunities of the white working class. The author documents the way in which these young people respond to such changes, and the way they help to create the conditions of their future lives. In the process, she explores issues of race, class and gender and considers the roles of school and family in the production of self.


Summary

First Published in 1990. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.


Author Notes

Lois Weis is Professor of Sociology of Education and Associate Dean of the Faculty of Educational Studies at the State University of New York at Buffalo. She is also the author of Between Two Worlds (RKP).


Reviews 2

Choice Review

Weis examines the identity formation process among white working-class students in a single high school. Amid hypotheses about the deindustrialization of America, the author documents how the young people respond to changes. She also explores issues of gender, race, and class in extensive interviews with students who are facing the reality of a radically different economy than that of their parents. Weis also examines the working-class teens' attitudes toward postfeminist thinking as well as the emerging New Right. Focusing on student lives and attitudes necessarily reveals other relationships among parents and teachers. Gender, class, and race issues are part of the fabric experienced by teachers and to which they necessarily contribute. In the deindustrializing society, students, parents, and teachers make choices about the social and political future. Even in a seemingly nonpolitical institution such as a high school, the structure and process vis-a-vis economic realities can produce a political agenda. The author is exploring new territory and drawing very tentative conclusions with this analysis. Extensive endnotes cite other research; the appendix contains interview questions. University collections. W. C. Bonifield Lilly Endowment


Choice Review

Weis examines the identity formation process among white working-class students in a single high school. Amid hypotheses about the deindustrialization of America, the author documents how the young people respond to changes. She also explores issues of gender, race, and class in extensive interviews with students who are facing the reality of a radically different economy than that of their parents. Weis also examines the working-class teens' attitudes toward postfeminist thinking as well as the emerging New Right. Focusing on student lives and attitudes necessarily reveals other relationships among parents and teachers. Gender, class, and race issues are part of the fabric experienced by teachers and to which they necessarily contribute. In the deindustrializing society, students, parents, and teachers make choices about the social and political future. Even in a seemingly nonpolitical institution such as a high school, the structure and process vis-a-vis economic realities can produce a political agenda. The author is exploring new territory and drawing very tentative conclusions with this analysis. Extensive endnotes cite other research; the appendix contains interview questions. University collections. W. C. Bonifield Lilly Endowment