Cover image for Just for kicks
Title:
Just for kicks
Author:
Baczewski, Paul.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Lippincott, [1990]

©1990
Physical Description:
182 pages ; 21 cm
Summary:
Fifteen-year-old Brandon does not suspect the difficulties in store for him as manager of the varsity football team when his sister Sarah joins and becomes the star punter.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
830 Lexile.
ISBN:
9780397324651

9780397324668
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library FICTION Young Adult Fiction Central Closed Stacks
Searching...

On Order

Summary

Summary

Fifteen-year-old Brandon does not suspect the difficulties in store for him as manager of the varsity football team when his sister Sarah joins and becomes the star punter.


Summary

Fifteen-year-old Brandon does not suspect the difficulties in store for him as manager of the varsity football team when his sister Sarah joins and becomes the star punter.


Reviews 4

Booklist Review

Gr. 6-9. Fifteen-year-old Brandon Lewis is manager of the high school varsity football team on which his older brothers play. The team is a good one, in spite of Coach Knox (who thinks practices should resemble marine boot camp), but Brandon feels it could be even better with the right kicker. He convinces sister Sarah (the best kicker he knows) to join the team, with predictable reactions from the coach and other players. Nevertheless, she is a star, and, with the help of Brandon's backseat coaching, the team wins the state championship. Baczewski's strength is in his witty dialogue and deadpan humor, which is mixed with a fair amount of locker room jocularity. His underlying message--that football (as well as most other passions) is better when played for fun and not taken overly seriously--will be well received by YAs. Adults may argue that the plot is implausible (and that no one as inept as Coach Knox could possibly manage to stay employed for 20 years), but young football enthusiasts--both male and female--will enjoy this high-spirited sports romp. ~--Kay Weisman


School Library Journal Review

Gr 7-9-- This is something different: the sports novel as farce. Brandon Lewis, the narrator (and the football team's manager), sends a lot of one-liners zinging through the pages--some are right on the mark, some wobble and hit the ground with a thud. The plot involves Brandon's extraordinary jock family, which includes the team's star quarterback and lineman (his brothers) and the star punter and field-goal kicker (his sister). The team is coached by a fanatic who believes in hard-hitting football until the middle of the book when he inexplicably becomes a devotee of trick plays. Most of the action centers around Brandon's description of the crunches, mashes, and head-tearing hits that the team engages in. Since he's a basketball player, he views it all with a certain disdain. By the novel's end, Brandon has become the unofficial assistant coach and has led the team to a state championship, his sister has become a star, and the coach of the opposing team is under constant psychiatric supervision. Those looking for a realistic sports book are not going to find it here, but the novel does provide a few laughs. --Todd Morning, Schaumburg Township Public Library, IL (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Booklist Review

Gr. 6-9. Fifteen-year-old Brandon Lewis is manager of the high school varsity football team on which his older brothers play. The team is a good one, in spite of Coach Knox (who thinks practices should resemble marine boot camp), but Brandon feels it could be even better with the right kicker. He convinces sister Sarah (the best kicker he knows) to join the team, with predictable reactions from the coach and other players. Nevertheless, she is a star, and, with the help of Brandon's backseat coaching, the team wins the state championship. Baczewski's strength is in his witty dialogue and deadpan humor, which is mixed with a fair amount of locker room jocularity. His underlying message--that football (as well as most other passions) is better when played for fun and not taken overly seriously--will be well received by YAs. Adults may argue that the plot is implausible (and that no one as inept as Coach Knox could possibly manage to stay employed for 20 years), but young football enthusiasts--both male and female--will enjoy this high-spirited sports romp. ~--Kay Weisman


School Library Journal Review

Gr 7-9-- This is something different: the sports novel as farce. Brandon Lewis, the narrator (and the football team's manager), sends a lot of one-liners zinging through the pages--some are right on the mark, some wobble and hit the ground with a thud. The plot involves Brandon's extraordinary jock family, which includes the team's star quarterback and lineman (his brothers) and the star punter and field-goal kicker (his sister). The team is coached by a fanatic who believes in hard-hitting football until the middle of the book when he inexplicably becomes a devotee of trick plays. Most of the action centers around Brandon's description of the crunches, mashes, and head-tearing hits that the team engages in. Since he's a basketball player, he views it all with a certain disdain. By the novel's end, Brandon has become the unofficial assistant coach and has led the team to a state championship, his sister has become a star, and the coach of the opposing team is under constant psychiatric supervision. Those looking for a realistic sports book are not going to find it here, but the novel does provide a few laughs. --Todd Morning, Schaumburg Township Public Library, IL (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Google Preview