Cover image for Articles of war : a collection of American poetry about World War II
Title:
Articles of war : a collection of American poetry about World War II
Author:
Stokesbury, Leon, 1945-
Publication Information:
Fayetteville : University of Arkansas Press, 1990.
Physical Description:
xxix, 229 pages ; 25 cm
General Note:
Includes index.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9781557281487

9781557281494
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library PS595.W64 A78 1990 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
Searching...

On Order

Summary

Summary

Unlike the often patriotic, romantic poetry of the First World War, the poetry of WWII draws heavily on themes of irony,guilt, horror, black comedy, and boredom. This anthology of about 120 poems by 53 poets, including Auden, Cummings, Jarrell, Hugo and Shapiro, spans 50 years of poetic responses to the war, ranging from those who wrote before the war to poets who know of the war only through the memories of their relatives. Paper edition (unseen), $12.95. Annotation(c) 2003 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)


Summary

Bizarre but true--games about war continue to grow in popularity. Perla (research analyst, Center for Naval Analysis) synthesizes the recreational and military aspects of wargaming. He explores the subject from its early history to its future potential, with particular attention to current practice and the fundamental principles and techniques governing the design and use of wargames. Unlike the often patriotic, romantic poetry of the First World War, the poetry of WWII draws heavily on themes of irony,guilt, horror, black comedy, and boredom. This anthology of about 120 poems by 53 poets, including Auden, Cummings, Jarrell, Hugo and Shapiro, spans 50 years of poetic responses to the war, ranging from those who wrote before the war to poets who know of the war only through the memories of their relatives. Paper edition (unseen), $12.95. Annotation copyrighted by Book News, Inc., Portland, OR


Reviews 4

Booklist Review

Heretofore, war anthologies have focused almost exclusively on verse from World War I and on British work with, perhaps, a handful of poems by U.S. authors. Stokesbury has taken a new approach, focusing on 50 years of exclusively American poetry pertaining to the second war to end all wars. Arranged chronologically by date of poets' births, the collection includes work by 53 poets. Some are the well-known and expected--Karl Shapiro, Randall Jarrell, John Ciardi, and Richard Wilbur. Others are a surprise because they are not usually associated with war poetry, such as Marianne Moore, or because they are too young to have experienced World War II firsthand (Andrew Hudgins and David Bottoms). Neither patriotic nor romantic, these are powerful poems, at times horrible but always honest, in a variety of styles. Sensitively edited by Leon Stokesbury, and including an insightful introductory essay by Paul Fussell, this is a must-buy poetry collection. ~--Jim Elledge


Choice Review

American poets found WW II a baffling subject: the horrors of modern warfare had already been described by Owen, Graves, and Sassoon the last time around, and facing the same enemy again in a mere two decades made the later poets feel a trifle embarrassed. Mass advertising had begun its erosion of the cutting edge of language, and the traditional elegy for dead soldiers was not consistent with the modernist aversion to romantic emotion. So, because there are fewer anthologies of WW II poetry than those devoted to WW I, this collection can truly be said to fill a void. Arranged chronologically by year of birth are 53 poets, from the antiwar Robinson Jeffers (born 1887), who records that Pearl Harbor caught us "unprepared, amazed and indignant," to P. H. Liotta (born 1956), whose poetic setting is a "faultlessly blue day in a war/ so long ago we pretend/ to barely hear its echoes." Also included are works by Phyllis McGinley, Marianne Moore, and May Sarton; Winfield Townley Scott's story of an American soldier who skins and dries a Japanese skull for a souvenir; Lucien Stryk's story of a French partisan forced to consume the flesh of a comrade while trapped in a cave; Reed Whittemore's duet of black and white crosses; and Auden's classic "September 1, 1939." There are several sensitive poems about the Holocaust, and one by William Trowbridge even dares to examine anti-Semitism at home. There is a brilliant introduction by Paul Fussell and an alphabetical appendix, but the commentary on each poet is so scant that when the poets use only initials, it is impossible to tell if they are male or female. Nonetheless, recommended for all poetry collections. J. Shreve Allegany Community College


Booklist Review

Heretofore, war anthologies have focused almost exclusively on verse from World War I and on British work with, perhaps, a handful of poems by U.S. authors. Stokesbury has taken a new approach, focusing on 50 years of exclusively American poetry pertaining to the second war to end all wars. Arranged chronologically by date of poets' births, the collection includes work by 53 poets. Some are the well-known and expected--Karl Shapiro, Randall Jarrell, John Ciardi, and Richard Wilbur. Others are a surprise because they are not usually associated with war poetry, such as Marianne Moore, or because they are too young to have experienced World War II firsthand (Andrew Hudgins and David Bottoms). Neither patriotic nor romantic, these are powerful poems, at times horrible but always honest, in a variety of styles. Sensitively edited by Leon Stokesbury, and including an insightful introductory essay by Paul Fussell, this is a must-buy poetry collection. ~--Jim Elledge


Choice Review

American poets found WW II a baffling subject: the horrors of modern warfare had already been described by Owen, Graves, and Sassoon the last time around, and facing the same enemy again in a mere two decades made the later poets feel a trifle embarrassed. Mass advertising had begun its erosion of the cutting edge of language, and the traditional elegy for dead soldiers was not consistent with the modernist aversion to romantic emotion. So, because there are fewer anthologies of WW II poetry than those devoted to WW I, this collection can truly be said to fill a void. Arranged chronologically by year of birth are 53 poets, from the antiwar Robinson Jeffers (born 1887), who records that Pearl Harbor caught us "unprepared, amazed and indignant," to P. H. Liotta (born 1956), whose poetic setting is a "faultlessly blue day in a war/ so long ago we pretend/ to barely hear its echoes." Also included are works by Phyllis McGinley, Marianne Moore, and May Sarton; Winfield Townley Scott's story of an American soldier who skins and dries a Japanese skull for a souvenir; Lucien Stryk's story of a French partisan forced to consume the flesh of a comrade while trapped in a cave; Reed Whittemore's duet of black and white crosses; and Auden's classic "September 1, 1939." There are several sensitive poems about the Holocaust, and one by William Trowbridge even dares to examine anti-Semitism at home. There is a brilliant introduction by Paul Fussell and an alphabetical appendix, but the commentary on each poet is so scant that when the poets use only initials, it is impossible to tell if they are male or female. Nonetheless, recommended for all poetry collections. J. Shreve Allegany Community College


Google Preview