Cover image for Exercise of conscience : a WW II objector remembers
Title:
Exercise of conscience : a WW II objector remembers
Author:
Van Dyck, Harry R.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Buffalo, N.Y. : Prometheus Books, [1990]

©1990
Physical Description:
250 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
Language:
English
Personal Subject:
ISBN:
9780879755843
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library D810.C82 V36 1990 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Reviews 2

Library Journal Review

There is little literature extant concerning the conscientious objector (CO) experience during World War II. Van Dyck, a Mennonite and retired University of North Texas sociology professor, relates his personal account as one of the 12,000 COs who served in the Civilian Public Service (CPS), a community service force. The level of government support provided CPS camp enrollees hardly provided basic subsistence. At camps, physical force was seldom used against COs. There was little sex, and boredom sometimes predominated. The author tells of the routines he performed at Hawthornden State Mental Hospital near Cleveland, and the reader gains insight into the COs pacifism and the negative attitudes of people toward them. Libraries needing to fill gaps in their World War II holdings or desiring something about COs should consider this.-- Scott Johnson, Meridian Community Coll. Lib., Miss. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


School Library Journal Review

YA-- A close examination of the integrity, rational, and problems of the pacifists who ``marched to a different drummer'' when the United States was engaged in a popular war. Van Dyck, a Mennonite who refused to enter military service during World War II, recounts his four years in a hastily organized Civilian Public Service (CPS) camp. Readers experience the daily life in a camp for a heterogeneous collection of men whose only common bond was their ``exercise of conscience.'' Writing in a comfortable narrative form, Van Dyck discusses the public resentment, his fellow pacifists who renounced their beliefs and joined the armed forces, and the government snafus that kept some conscientious objectors in the camps for years. The theme of this book will raise controversial discussion.-- Mike Printz, Librarian, Topeka West High School, Topeka, KS (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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