Cover image for The astronomers
Title:
The astronomers
Author:
Goldsmith, Donald.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : St. Martin's Press, 1991.
Physical Description:
xviii, 332 pages ; 25 cm
General Note:
Companion book to the PBS television series.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780312053802
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library QB44.2 .G63 1991 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
Searching...
Orchard Park Library QB44.2 .G63 1991 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
Searching...

On Order

Reviews 2

Booklist Review

This companion to the recent PBS TV series makes an excellent basic astronomy and cosmology text. It traces recent research in both fields, providing easily read explanations of such strange phenomena as quasars and black holes and the history and current theory of how stars work. Goldsmith, an astronomer himself, obviously knows many of the colleagues he mentions, professionally if not on a first-name basis. In the preface, Goldsmith voices his hopes that the book will spur future scientists into these fields, despite such risks (no doubt quite surprising to many readers) as suffering from the effects of a lack of oxygen while at work studying the stars through the newer telescopes on some of the world's higher mountains, such as Mauna Kea in Hawaii. ~--Jon Kartman


Library Journal Review

Published in conjunction with the PBS television series of the same name, this book explores some of the major areas of contemporary astronomy. Although there are numerous, brief biographical sketches of individual scientists, the emphasis is chiefly and properly on their works. Topics include cosmology, stellar evolution, dark matter, quasars, the search for planets beyond the solar system, and the Voyager missions to the outer planets. The author is a professional astronomer turned skillful popularizer ( Supernova!: The Exploding Star of 1987 , LJ 10/1/89); accordingly, the scientific details are accurate, and the narrative is very readable. Occasionally, the historical sections are a bit misleading or unreliable as found in the discussion of Lord Kelvin's speculations on the age of the earth. Color photographs make this book visually spectacular. Recommended for public and college libraries.-- Jack W. Weigel, Univ. of Michigan Lib., Ann Arbor (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Google Preview