Cover image for Challenging capital punishment : legal and social science approaches
Title:
Challenging capital punishment : legal and social science approaches
Author:
Haas, Kenneth C.
Publication Information:
Newbury Park : Sage Publications, [1988]

©1988
Physical Description:
302 pages ; 23 cm.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780803929098

9780803929104
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library KF9227.C2 C46 1988 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

In Challenging Capital Punishment, Haas and Inciardi reveal the persistence of myth and misinformation in the death penalty debate. They suggest that the debate needs to be based on scholarly analysis and scientific scrutiny. They therefore bring together social scientists and legal scholars who assess the validity of objections to the death penalty.


Summary

In Challenging Capital Punishment, Haas and Inciardi reveal the persistence of myth and misinformation in the death penalty debate. They suggest that the debate needs to be based on scholarly analysis and scientific scrutiny. They therefore bring together social scientists and legal scholars who assess the validity of objections to the death penalty.


Reviews 2

Choice Review

The theme of the treatises collected by Haas and Inciardi is that capital punishment is cruel, barbaric, and should be abolished. Our failure to do so leaves "the United States in the embarrassing company of the Soviet Union, South Africa, Iran, and the People's Republic of China as among the very few nations that execute more than one or two people each year." Chapters explore the courts' attempts to use social science research to abolish or support capital punishment. A vitally important issue is the use of "death qualified" juries--including only persons who believe in capital punishment. Research shows that "Jurors who survive death qualification are. . .more likely to be male, to be white, to be well-off financially, to be Republican, and to be Protestant or Catholic." This does not always insure trial by one's peers. The contributors contend that: "In the 1980s the public strongly favors capital punishment. In most cases this attitude is based on very little information. The desire to acquire more information is negligible, and when new information contrary to one's attitude is learned, the attitude remains unchanged." The last chapter describes conditions on "Death Row" in numerous state prisons and leaves the reader feeling angry or sick or both. Quite useful to undergraduate students of criminal justice. H. E. Albert Clemson University


Choice Review

The theme of the treatises collected by Haas and Inciardi is that capital punishment is cruel, barbaric, and should be abolished. Our failure to do so leaves "the United States in the embarrassing company of the Soviet Union, South Africa, Iran, and the People's Republic of China as among the very few nations that execute more than one or two people each year." Chapters explore the courts' attempts to use social science research to abolish or support capital punishment. A vitally important issue is the use of "death qualified" juries--including only persons who believe in capital punishment. Research shows that "Jurors who survive death qualification are. . .more likely to be male, to be white, to be well-off financially, to be Republican, and to be Protestant or Catholic." This does not always insure trial by one's peers. The contributors contend that: "In the 1980s the public strongly favors capital punishment. In most cases this attitude is based on very little information. The desire to acquire more information is negligible, and when new information contrary to one's attitude is learned, the attitude remains unchanged." The last chapter describes conditions on "Death Row" in numerous state prisons and leaves the reader feeling angry or sick or both. Quite useful to undergraduate students of criminal justice. H. E. Albert Clemson University


Table of Contents

Lingering Doubts About a Popular PunishmentK C Haas and J A Inciardi
The Justice of the Death Penalty in an Unjust WorldJ Reiman
The Effect of Executions is Brutalization, Not DeterrenceW J Bowers
Fallibility and FinalityM L Radelet and H A Bedau
Type II Errors and Capital Punishment
Racial Considerations in Capital PunishmentR Paternoster and A Kazyaka
The Failure of Evenhanded Justice
Death By JuryV P Hans
Unpleasant FactsP C Ellsworth
The Supreme Court's Response to Empirical Research on Capital Punishment
A Case Study of the Misuse of Social Science in Capital Punishment CasesD D Dorin
The Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court's Finding of Racial Discrimination in Watson (1980)
Imposing the Death Penalty on ChildrenV L Streib
Death Row - Hope for the FutureJ L Carroll
Lingering Doubts About a Popular PunishmentK C Haas and J A Inciardi
The Justice of the Death Penalty in an Unjust WorldJ Reiman
The Effect of Executions is Brutalization, Not DeterrenceW J Bowers
Fallibility and FinalityM L Radelet and H A Bedau
Type II Errors and Capital Punishment
Racial Considerations in Capital PunishmentR Paternoster and A Kazyaka
The Failure of Evenhanded Justice
Death By JuryV P Hans
Unpleasant FactsP C Ellsworth
The Supreme Court's Response to Empirical Research on Capital Punishment
A Case Study of the Misuse of Social Science in Capital Punishment CasesD D Dorin
The Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court's Finding of Racial Discrimination in Watson (1980)
Imposing the Death Penalty on ChildrenV L Streib
Death Row - Hope for the FutureJ L Carroll

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