Cover image for A cool kid-- like me!
Title:
A cool kid-- like me!
Author:
Wilhelm, Hans.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Crown Publishers, [1990]

©1990
Physical Description:
31 unnumbered pages : color illustrations ; 19 x 24 cm
Summary:
A young boy who is "cool" on the outside has some inner fears that he expresses to his grandmother.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780517578216

9780517578223
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Grand Island Library PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Audubon Library J PIC BK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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On Order

Summary

Summary

A young boy who is cool on the outside has some inner fears that he expresses to his grandmother.


Summary

A young boy who is "cool" on the outside has some inner fears that he expresses to his grandmother.


Author Notes

Hans Wilhelm was born in Bremen, Germany in 1945. In his early teens he wrote and illustrated several stories, bound them into little books and sent them off to publishers, but they were always rejected. After graduating from art and business schools, Wilhelm moved to Africa, where he worked for a major corporation for several years. Still very much interested in the arts, however, he wrote and illustrated stories for fun.

Eventually, he gave up his job and began traveling the world in search of a different kind of life. Wilhelm traveled for three years and lived in many places in Australia, Asia and Europe. He finally came to America to publish his stories and ended up settling down in Connecticut.

Since then he has written and illustrated more than one hundredand fifty books for children and adults that have been translated into many languages. They have won numerous international prizes and awards and were developed into more than 80 television shows.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Hans Wilhelm was born in Bremen, Germany in 1945. In his early teens he wrote and illustrated several stories, bound them into little books and sent them off to publishers, but they were always rejected. After graduating from art and business schools, Wilhelm moved to Africa, where he worked for a major corporation for several years. Still very much interested in the arts, however, he wrote and illustrated stories for fun.

Eventually, he gave up his job and began traveling the world in search of a different kind of life. Wilhelm traveled for three years and lived in many places in Australia, Asia and Europe. He finally came to America to publish his stories and ended up settling down in Connecticut.

Since then he has written and illustrated more than one hundredand fifty books for children and adults that have been translated into many languages. They have won numerous international prizes and awards and were developed into more than 80 television shows.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 6

Booklist Review

Ages 4-6. Often left alone by parents preoccupied with themselves and their work, the youngster telling this story confides that his mom and dad really don't know him very well. They think he's self-assured and cool, but his grandma understands that he's still a little boy with doubts and insecurities. Before she leaves on a vacation, Grandma gives him a teddy bear. His parents are aghast: "He's too old for that. . . . He's already into computers." But teddy does the trick, helping the boy through those dark nights and enabling him to be "as cool as he could be." With softly painted illustrations as sensitive as the message, this unusual story gives kids license to be kids, and it reminds everyone that cuddly toys still have their place, even in a high-tech world. ~--Ellen Mandel


Publisher's Weekly Review

The author-illustrator of such favorites as I'll Always Love You and Let's Be Friends Again! here addresses an issue near and dear to the egos of contemporary youngsters--the importance of being ``cool.'' The boy who tells this story is so cool that he doesn't like to be hugged, except by his Grandma. Only to her will he confess the awful truth: his coolness is merely a facade, and he's actually terrified without the night-light on. When Grandma goes on vacation, she gives the boy a teddy bear to keep him company. Although his parents think he's too old for a stuffed animal (and the boy thinks it's a weird present for a cool kid), in Grandma's absence the bear becomes a confidant, listening patiently as the boy tells of his inner fears--fears that most children will relate to. Once again, Wilhelm proves that he knows his audience inside and out, and knows how to reach them in words and pictures. This book will reassure youngsters who share the narrator's interest in appearing cool, as well as those who know someone like him--a broad universe indeed. Ages 3-7. (Aug.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

K-Gr 3-- A refreshingly honest picture book, told in the first person by an only child. His busy, emotionally distant parents treat him as if he were a third adult in the household, but he does get love and attention from his grandmother. When Grandma leaves for a long vacation, she gives the boy a teddy bear, to whom he can confide his nighttime fears of being laughed at, of not having a best friend, of his parents arguing. The story ends on an upbeat note, with his apprehensions subsiding in the daylight, and his grandmother's return. Wilhelm conveys plenty of emotion in a brief text, and the watercolor illustrations beautifully enhance both meaning and mood of the story. Especially effective is a picture showing the child leaning against a wall, framed on each side by the shadow of an angry parent. Picture books depicting more dramatic problems have become fairly commonplace, but not many approach the subject of a middle-class family in which a child may be ignored or misunderstood. A sympathetic look at how life can be in an imperfect, human world, where both young and old can thrive by building support systems. --Lauralyn Persson, Wilmette Public Library, IL (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Booklist Review

Ages 4-6. Often left alone by parents preoccupied with themselves and their work, the youngster telling this story confides that his mom and dad really don't know him very well. They think he's self-assured and cool, but his grandma understands that he's still a little boy with doubts and insecurities. Before she leaves on a vacation, Grandma gives him a teddy bear. His parents are aghast: "He's too old for that. . . . He's already into computers." But teddy does the trick, helping the boy through those dark nights and enabling him to be "as cool as he could be." With softly painted illustrations as sensitive as the message, this unusual story gives kids license to be kids, and it reminds everyone that cuddly toys still have their place, even in a high-tech world. ~--Ellen Mandel


Publisher's Weekly Review

The author-illustrator of such favorites as I'll Always Love You and Let's Be Friends Again! here addresses an issue near and dear to the egos of contemporary youngsters--the importance of being ``cool.'' The boy who tells this story is so cool that he doesn't like to be hugged, except by his Grandma. Only to her will he confess the awful truth: his coolness is merely a facade, and he's actually terrified without the night-light on. When Grandma goes on vacation, she gives the boy a teddy bear to keep him company. Although his parents think he's too old for a stuffed animal (and the boy thinks it's a weird present for a cool kid), in Grandma's absence the bear becomes a confidant, listening patiently as the boy tells of his inner fears--fears that most children will relate to. Once again, Wilhelm proves that he knows his audience inside and out, and knows how to reach them in words and pictures. This book will reassure youngsters who share the narrator's interest in appearing cool, as well as those who know someone like him--a broad universe indeed. Ages 3-7. (Aug.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

K-Gr 3-- A refreshingly honest picture book, told in the first person by an only child. His busy, emotionally distant parents treat him as if he were a third adult in the household, but he does get love and attention from his grandmother. When Grandma leaves for a long vacation, she gives the boy a teddy bear, to whom he can confide his nighttime fears of being laughed at, of not having a best friend, of his parents arguing. The story ends on an upbeat note, with his apprehensions subsiding in the daylight, and his grandmother's return. Wilhelm conveys plenty of emotion in a brief text, and the watercolor illustrations beautifully enhance both meaning and mood of the story. Especially effective is a picture showing the child leaning against a wall, framed on each side by the shadow of an angry parent. Picture books depicting more dramatic problems have become fairly commonplace, but not many approach the subject of a middle-class family in which a child may be ignored or misunderstood. A sympathetic look at how life can be in an imperfect, human world, where both young and old can thrive by building support systems. --Lauralyn Persson, Wilmette Public Library, IL (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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