Cover image for Introducing mammals to young naturalists : from Texas parks & wildlife magazine
Title:
Introducing mammals to young naturalists : from Texas parks & wildlife magazine
Author:
Hiller, Ilo, 1938-
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
College Station : Texas A & M University Press, [1990]

©1990
Physical Description:
111 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 29 cm.
Summary:
Introduces the mammals of Texas, examining such species as the prairie dog, beaver, armadillo, and porcupine.
General Note:
Includes index.
Language:
English
Subject Term:
Added Uniform Title:
Texas parks & wildlife.
ISBN:
9780890964279

9780890964286
Format :
Book

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QL719.T4 H55 1990 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks-Oversize
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Summary

Summary

Introduces the mammals of Texas, examining such species as the prairie dog, beaver, armadillo, and porcupine.


Summary

Introduces the mammals of Texas, examining such species as the prairie dog, beaver, armadillo, and porcupine.


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

Gr. 5-9. Flowing, informative articles, mostly written for Texas Parks and Wildlife magazine, introduce readers to a variety of mammals. While some, like the javelina and armadillo, are regional creatures, skunks, squirrels, and red foxes commonly inhabit a broader range of the country. Whether or not the critters are found in readers' backyards, Hiller's knowledgeable details about their life cycles, feeding and nesting habits, and daily rhythms are highlighted by intriguing facts on such particulars as the growth of white-tailed deer antlers, the notorious spray mechanisms of skunks, and the difficulties of removing porcupine quills. Color and black-and-white photographs are augmented with drawings. The book's concluding chapters promote readers' scientific interests through word games and art projects that include instructions for constructing a pantograph, a useful tool for enlarging animal drawings. The wealth of attractively presented, highly readable information extends this book beyond its regional emphasis to reach the interest of all budding naturalists. --Ellen Mandel


Booklist Review

Gr. 5-9. Flowing, informative articles, mostly written for Texas Parks and Wildlife magazine, introduce readers to a variety of mammals. While some, like the javelina and armadillo, are regional creatures, skunks, squirrels, and red foxes commonly inhabit a broader range of the country. Whether or not the critters are found in readers' backyards, Hiller's knowledgeable details about their life cycles, feeding and nesting habits, and daily rhythms are highlighted by intriguing facts on such particulars as the growth of white-tailed deer antlers, the notorious spray mechanisms of skunks, and the difficulties of removing porcupine quills. Color and black-and-white photographs are augmented with drawings. The book's concluding chapters promote readers' scientific interests through word games and art projects that include instructions for constructing a pantograph, a useful tool for enlarging animal drawings. The wealth of attractively presented, highly readable information extends this book beyond its regional emphasis to reach the interest of all budding naturalists. --Ellen Mandel