Cover image for Robust unionism : innovations in the labor movement
Title:
Robust unionism : innovations in the labor movement
Author:
Shostak, Arthur B.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Ithaca, N.Y. : ILR Press, School of Industrial and Labor Relations, Cornell University, [1991]

©1991
Physical Description:
368 pages ; 23 cm
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780875461694

9780875461700
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library HD6508 .S5217 1991 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

Shostak (Sociology, Drexel University) argues that labor has the potential to become a politically powerful and socially dynamic agent for change in the 1990s. Interwining case studies, anecdotes, he focuses first on workplace issues such as safety and health, and moves on to examine creative ways in which unions are encouraging membership growth, strengthening their community base, and enhancing their public relations. Paper edition (unseen), $18.95. Annotation(c) 2003 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)


Summary

Shostak (Sociology, Drexel University) argues that labor has the potential to become a politically powerful and socially dynamic agent for change in the 1990s. Interwining case studies, anecdotes, he focuses first on workplace issues such as safety and health, and moves on to examine creative ways in which unions are encouraging membership growth, strengthening their community base, and enhancing their public relations. Paper edition (unseen), $18.95. Annotation copyrighted by Book News, Inc., Portland, OR


Reviews 4

Library Journal Review

By examining labor union activities at the cutting edge, particularly at the grassroots level, Shostak provides a healthy corrective to the popular image that organized labor is all but moribund. Taking into account a wealth of novel experiments and innovative activities, he finds that organized labor is ``robust,'' with a remarkable will to survive and the ability to flourish. Nevertheless, he cautions that trade unionism may still be overwhelmed by die-hard employer opposition, a hostile legal and legislative climate, lack of popular support, and internal conflicts over ends and means. This is a useful guide to how many unions function on a day-to-day basis in organizing workers and in collective bargaining. Recommended for subject collections.-- Harry Frumerman, formerly with Hunter Coll., CUNY (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Choice Review

In contrast to many recent analyses of organized labor, this book describes examples of successful innovations within the labor movement and positive strategies for future growth. Shostak contends: "From start to finish the cases discussed in this volume refute the caricature of labor as a relic, as a dinosaurlike object unwilling or unable to adapt rapidly enough to future shock.'" His material is organized around five broad topical areas: workplace issues, organizing and reorganizing, unions and the community, public relations and politics, and unions and business. Within each category, the author develops specific topics through the case study method. In the section on organizing and reorganizing, for example, he analyzes the emergence of the National Air Traffic Controllers Association, which replaced the earlier controllers' union decertified as a result of its illegal strike in 1981. Other case studies deal with such timely issues as community action, worker ownership, use of pension funds, and the success of the Harvard clerical and technical workers' union. In general, a good overview of new directions in the labor movement. College and public library collections. R. L. Hogler Colorado State University


Library Journal Review

By examining labor union activities at the cutting edge, particularly at the grassroots level, Shostak provides a healthy corrective to the popular image that organized labor is all but moribund. Taking into account a wealth of novel experiments and innovative activities, he finds that organized labor is ``robust,'' with a remarkable will to survive and the ability to flourish. Nevertheless, he cautions that trade unionism may still be overwhelmed by die-hard employer opposition, a hostile legal and legislative climate, lack of popular support, and internal conflicts over ends and means. This is a useful guide to how many unions function on a day-to-day basis in organizing workers and in collective bargaining. Recommended for subject collections.-- Harry Frumerman, formerly with Hunter Coll., CUNY (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Choice Review

In contrast to many recent analyses of organized labor, this book describes examples of successful innovations within the labor movement and positive strategies for future growth. Shostak contends: "From start to finish the cases discussed in this volume refute the caricature of labor as a relic, as a dinosaurlike object unwilling or unable to adapt rapidly enough to future shock.'" His material is organized around five broad topical areas: workplace issues, organizing and reorganizing, unions and the community, public relations and politics, and unions and business. Within each category, the author develops specific topics through the case study method. In the section on organizing and reorganizing, for example, he analyzes the emergence of the National Air Traffic Controllers Association, which replaced the earlier controllers' union decertified as a result of its illegal strike in 1981. Other case studies deal with such timely issues as community action, worker ownership, use of pension funds, and the success of the Harvard clerical and technical workers' union. In general, a good overview of new directions in the labor movement. College and public library collections. R. L. Hogler Colorado State University


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