Cover image for American commercial banking : a history
Title:
American commercial banking : a history
Author:
Klebaner, Benjamin Joseph, 1926-
Publication Information:
Boston : Twayne Publishers, 1990.
Physical Description:
xi, 283 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780805798043

9780805798159
Format :
Book

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HG2481 .K6 1990 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

Traces the evolution of commercial banking from before the American revolution, but particular emphasis is placed on the last 60 years, with the introduction of new credit instruments and the impact of government regulation and deregulation. Annotation copyrighted by Book News, Inc., Portland, OR


Summary

Traces the evolution of commercial banking from before the American revolution, but particular emphasis is placed on the last 60 years, with the introduction of new credit instruments and the impact of government regulation and deregulation. Annotation copyrighted by Book News, Inc., Portland, OR


Reviews 4

Booklist Review

Klebaner, a professor of economics at City College of the City University of New York, has completely revised, updated, and enlarged his earlier Commercial Banking in the U.S. (Dryden Press, 1974). He parallels the 200-year history of the banking industry with that of the U.S. itself. Klebaner emphasizes how banking has changed over the years and details the significant transformation resulting from deregulation. This book is particularly accessible to those without economics backgrounds who might be interested in economic aspects of U.S. history or who are interested in the many challenges facing banking today. A chronology of major events, notes, and a helpful bibliography are appended. To be indexed. --David Rouse


Choice Review

Klebaner (economics, City University of New York) has written a concise but comprehensive history of commercial banking in the US. He describes how commercial banks first developed in the newly independent US and continues his review up through trends in banking in the 1980s. Klebaner traces the development of banking as increased government regulation and involvement, panics and depressions, and social discontent occurred over the last two centuries. In particular, he focuses on different strategies to create a national central bank, such as the First and Second Bank of the United States and the Federal Reserve System. The author extensively discusses recent developments in commercial banking, including the development of new corporate debt instruments and bank deregulation. The volume is full of interesting data that enhance the narrative. Bibliography and extensive endnotes. Excellent supplementary reading for upper-division graduate students of money and banking, economic history, or American history. S. Shapiro University of New Haven


Booklist Review

Klebaner, a professor of economics at City College of the City University of New York, has completely revised, updated, and enlarged his earlier Commercial Banking in the U.S. (Dryden Press, 1974). He parallels the 200-year history of the banking industry with that of the U.S. itself. Klebaner emphasizes how banking has changed over the years and details the significant transformation resulting from deregulation. This book is particularly accessible to those without economics backgrounds who might be interested in economic aspects of U.S. history or who are interested in the many challenges facing banking today. A chronology of major events, notes, and a helpful bibliography are appended. To be indexed. --David Rouse


Choice Review

Klebaner (economics, City University of New York) has written a concise but comprehensive history of commercial banking in the US. He describes how commercial banks first developed in the newly independent US and continues his review up through trends in banking in the 1980s. Klebaner traces the development of banking as increased government regulation and involvement, panics and depressions, and social discontent occurred over the last two centuries. In particular, he focuses on different strategies to create a national central bank, such as the First and Second Bank of the United States and the Federal Reserve System. The author extensively discusses recent developments in commercial banking, including the development of new corporate debt instruments and bank deregulation. The volume is full of interesting data that enhance the narrative. Bibliography and extensive endnotes. Excellent supplementary reading for upper-division graduate students of money and banking, economic history, or American history. S. Shapiro University of New Haven