Cover image for Women who walk through fire : women's fantasy & science fiction, vol. 2
Title:
Women who walk through fire : women's fantasy & science fiction, vol. 2
Author:
Sturgis, Susanna J.
Publication Information:
Freedom, CA : Crossing Press, [1990]

©1990
Physical Description:
275 pages ; 22 cm
Language:
English
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780895944207

9780895944191
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library PS648.F3 W6 1990 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Reviews 6

Booklist Review

An anthology of sf tales written by women. Among the best stories are Eleanor Arnason's "A Ceremony of Discontent" and Lucy Sussex's "My Lady Tongue." Other contributors include Phyllis Ann Karr, Rachel Pollack, and Ginger Simpson Curry. Editor Sturgis' competent introduction offers pertinent thoughts on feminism and sf. A reasonable value for larger women's studies or science fiction collections. --Roland Green


Publisher's Weekly Review

Scorning laser-wielding princesses who take second place to (and then marry) their space-age heroes, Sturgis's ( Memories and Visions ) strong collection of 16 feminist science fiction stories describes women who meet and master challenges. In Elaine Bergstrom's chilling ``Net Songs,'' a woman defies the powers that be when she learns they maintain order by manipulating society's fear of sexually communicated disease. A divorced mother collects her alimony by raiding her wealthy ex-husband's trucks on their interstate hauls in G. K. Sprinkle's ``Road Runner.'' In J. L. Comeau's ``Firebird,'' a policewoman is the only member of a tactical assault team who can fight a drudep. 148 , or nightmare fiend, that exploits people's deepest fears. ``Sahrel Short Swords,'' by Ginger Simpson Curry, depicts a woman who learns about empathy and humanity when a sorceress turns her into a moth. The journalist who narrates L. Timmel Duchamp's ``The Forbidden Words of Margaret A.'' reports on her brief ``photo-op'' with a prisoner who is surrounded by armed guards and missiles because her subversive comments are powerful enough to destroy the U.S. government. (Sept.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Library Journal Review

In this collection of 16 stories (most previously unpublished) by women sf and fantasy writers, a policewoman's battle with an enemy becomes a journey into nightmare in J.L. Comeau's ``Firebird''; a mother ponders the unplanned outcome of her daughter's life in Deborah H. Fruin's ``New Age Baby''; and a poor girl takes a magical trip to the wealthy side of town in Rachel Pollack's ``The Girl Who Went to the Rich Neighborhood.'' Eclectic in viewpoint, astereotypical in its feminist approach, this volume should appeal to a wide readership. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Booklist Review

An anthology of sf tales written by women. Among the best stories are Eleanor Arnason's "A Ceremony of Discontent" and Lucy Sussex's "My Lady Tongue." Other contributors include Phyllis Ann Karr, Rachel Pollack, and Ginger Simpson Curry. Editor Sturgis' competent introduction offers pertinent thoughts on feminism and sf. A reasonable value for larger women's studies or science fiction collections. --Roland Green


Publisher's Weekly Review

Scorning laser-wielding princesses who take second place to (and then marry) their space-age heroes, Sturgis's ( Memories and Visions ) strong collection of 16 feminist science fiction stories describes women who meet and master challenges. In Elaine Bergstrom's chilling ``Net Songs,'' a woman defies the powers that be when she learns they maintain order by manipulating society's fear of sexually communicated disease. A divorced mother collects her alimony by raiding her wealthy ex-husband's trucks on their interstate hauls in G. K. Sprinkle's ``Road Runner.'' In J. L. Comeau's ``Firebird,'' a policewoman is the only member of a tactical assault team who can fight a drudep. 148 , or nightmare fiend, that exploits people's deepest fears. ``Sahrel Short Swords,'' by Ginger Simpson Curry, depicts a woman who learns about empathy and humanity when a sorceress turns her into a moth. The journalist who narrates L. Timmel Duchamp's ``The Forbidden Words of Margaret A.'' reports on her brief ``photo-op'' with a prisoner who is surrounded by armed guards and missiles because her subversive comments are powerful enough to destroy the U.S. government. (Sept.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Library Journal Review

In this collection of 16 stories (most previously unpublished) by women sf and fantasy writers, a policewoman's battle with an enemy becomes a journey into nightmare in J.L. Comeau's ``Firebird''; a mother ponders the unplanned outcome of her daughter's life in Deborah H. Fruin's ``New Age Baby''; and a poor girl takes a magical trip to the wealthy side of town in Rachel Pollack's ``The Girl Who Went to the Rich Neighborhood.'' Eclectic in viewpoint, astereotypical in its feminist approach, this volume should appeal to a wide readership. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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