Cover image for The day we walked on the moon : a photo history of space exploration
Title:
The day we walked on the moon : a photo history of space exploration
Author:
Sullivan, George, 1927-
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Scholastic, [1990]

©1990
Physical Description:
72 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 27 cm
Summary:
Traces the technological developments which have made it possible to explore outer space and walk on the moon. Also discusses the training of astronauts and the future of space exploration.
General Note:
Photo credits: p. 72.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780590436328
Format :
Book

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TL793 .S925 1990 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Summary

Summary

Traces the technological developments which have made it possible to explore outer space and walk on the moon. Also discusses the training of astronauts and the future of space exploration.


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

Gr. 5-8. Sullivan documents the history of U.S. space exploration, providing newspaper clippings and news and NASA photographs, most in color, to show the accomplishments of both the U.S. and the Soviet Union. Using the U.S. moon landing to introduce this story of human and technological achievement, Sullivan not only considers such successes as the first woman in space and the first spacewalk, but also technology like unmanned satellites, Skylab, and the space shuttles. He does, however, gloss over other topics such as the work involved in the development of booster rockets for lift-off and the effort necessary for getting political support. Sections on astronaut training and future projects round out the treatment. The launching of the Hubble telescope in its time line but not in the text. Index. ~--Beth Herbert


School Library Journal Review

Gr 4-5-- A conventional history of space exploration from Sputnik to Voyager , with a look into the near future, featuring paintings and photographs, some blurry, most in color, plus selected New York Times front pages. Writing in his usual clear, concise way, this reliable author focuses special attention on the achievements of the Apollo and Space Shuttle programs rather than on the personal lives of astronauts (although readers may infer that only the women are married Sally Ride or have children Christa McAuliffe). Except for the Challenger explosion, he does not discuss the space program's reverses, nor, except for the early days, the programs of other countries; in addition, some of the photo captions are confusing. Sullivan closes with a chronology that becomes speculative with the launching of the Hubble Space Telescope last April and a bibliography that is also dated. Limitations aside, this covers a wide field in some depth, and may be useful to smaller collections. --John Peters, New York Public Library (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.