Cover image for The snow lady : a tale of Trotter Street
Title:
The snow lady : a tale of Trotter Street
Author:
Hughes, Shirley.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Lothrop, Lee and Shepard Books, 1990.
Summary:
Sam and Barney build a snow lady that resembles their elderly neighbor, mean Mrs. Dean.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780688098742

9780688098759
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library PIC BK. Juvenile Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Williamsville Library PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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On Order

Summary

Summary

Sam and Barney build a snow lady that resembles their elderly neighbor, mean Mrs. Dean.


Summary

Sam and Barney build a snow lady that resembles their elderly neighbor, mean Mrs. Dean.


Author Notes

Author and illustrator Shirley Hughes was born near Liverpool, U. K. on July 16, 1927. She studied drawing and costume design at Liverpool School of Art and the Ruskin School of Drawing in Oxford. At first she was an illustrator of other author's works, but in 1960 she published Lucy and Tom's Day, which was the first book she wrote and illustrated. Since then she has written and illustrated over 50 books. She won the Kate Greenaway Medal for Dogger in 1977, the Eleanor Farjeon Award for distinguished services to children's literature in 1984, and the OBE for services to children's literature in 1998. She currently lives in London with her husband.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Author and illustrator Shirley Hughes was born near Liverpool, U. K. on July 16, 1927. She studied drawing and costume design at Liverpool School of Art and the Ruskin School of Drawing in Oxford. At first she was an illustrator of other author's works, but in 1960 she published Lucy and Tom's Day, which was the first book she wrote and illustrated. Since then she has written and illustrated over 50 books. She won the Kate Greenaway Medal for Dogger in 1977, the Eleanor Farjeon Award for distinguished services to children's literature in 1984, and the OBE for services to children's literature in 1998. She currently lives in London with her husband.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 4

Booklist Review

Ages 5-8. Having finicky old Mrs. Dean for a next-door neighbor and after-school sitter means that Samantha must put up with the woman's fretful complaints. But when Sam and Barney name their snow lady "Mrs. Mean" and spell it out in stones at the base, Sam spends an anxious Christmas eve wondering if she can get outside to kick the stones away before her neighbor sees the letters. While not all children will find this Tale of Trotter Street as satisfying as others in the series, it takes a subject not often seen in picture books and treats it with a sense of emotional truth bound to strike a chord in many kids. What's more, the many full-color illustrations show Hughes' facility for realistically capturing children's moods and activities in a way that never precludes the underlying sense of joy. An engaging Christmas book, not overtly religious, but fundamentally so. ~--Carolyn Phelan


School Library Journal Review

K-Gr 3-- After school, Sam goes to elderly Mrs. Dean's until her family comes home. The two get along well, but Mrs. Dean is sometimes impatient with children, and Sam is glad to hear her mother's key in the lock. Sam's friend Barney, however, dislikes Mrs. Dean because ``she's always interfering and she hardly ever smiles.'' In fact, when he and Sam take advantage of a sudden snowfall and build a snow lady, Barney spells out ``Mrs. Mean'' on it because it reminds them both of the old woman. When Mrs. Dean returns unexpectedly, late on Christmas Eve, Sam worries that her feelings will be hurt by the sign on the snow lady, and her dreams that night are a jumble of anxieties wrapped in holiday paper and ribbon. Hughes draws children so that they have solidity, quirkiness, and individuality. She closely observes their outer life--the sweaters they wear, their shoes, their haircuts, showing 20th-century boys and girls--and she has an equally extraordinary talent for depicting their inner lives. The gently humorous drawing of Sam and Mrs. Dean side by side watching television captures an aspect of their relationship perfectly. Through many small gestures and poises, Hughes reveals the conscience-stricken Sam's uneasiness. Like Angel Mae (Lothrop, 1989), the story takes place at Christmas time but is not overwhelmed by the holiday. Whether as a yuletide adventure or a year-round story of compassion, this is a first-rate addition to picture book collections. --Anna Biagioni Hart, Sherwood Regional Lib . , Alexandria, VA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Booklist Review

Ages 5-8. Having finicky old Mrs. Dean for a next-door neighbor and after-school sitter means that Samantha must put up with the woman's fretful complaints. But when Sam and Barney name their snow lady "Mrs. Mean" and spell it out in stones at the base, Sam spends an anxious Christmas eve wondering if she can get outside to kick the stones away before her neighbor sees the letters. While not all children will find this Tale of Trotter Street as satisfying as others in the series, it takes a subject not often seen in picture books and treats it with a sense of emotional truth bound to strike a chord in many kids. What's more, the many full-color illustrations show Hughes' facility for realistically capturing children's moods and activities in a way that never precludes the underlying sense of joy. An engaging Christmas book, not overtly religious, but fundamentally so. ~--Carolyn Phelan


School Library Journal Review

K-Gr 3-- After school, Sam goes to elderly Mrs. Dean's until her family comes home. The two get along well, but Mrs. Dean is sometimes impatient with children, and Sam is glad to hear her mother's key in the lock. Sam's friend Barney, however, dislikes Mrs. Dean because ``she's always interfering and she hardly ever smiles.'' In fact, when he and Sam take advantage of a sudden snowfall and build a snow lady, Barney spells out ``Mrs. Mean'' on it because it reminds them both of the old woman. When Mrs. Dean returns unexpectedly, late on Christmas Eve, Sam worries that her feelings will be hurt by the sign on the snow lady, and her dreams that night are a jumble of anxieties wrapped in holiday paper and ribbon. Hughes draws children so that they have solidity, quirkiness, and individuality. She closely observes their outer life--the sweaters they wear, their shoes, their haircuts, showing 20th-century boys and girls--and she has an equally extraordinary talent for depicting their inner lives. The gently humorous drawing of Sam and Mrs. Dean side by side watching television captures an aspect of their relationship perfectly. Through many small gestures and poises, Hughes reveals the conscience-stricken Sam's uneasiness. Like Angel Mae (Lothrop, 1989), the story takes place at Christmas time but is not overwhelmed by the holiday. Whether as a yuletide adventure or a year-round story of compassion, this is a first-rate addition to picture book collections. --Anna Biagioni Hart, Sherwood Regional Lib . , Alexandria, VA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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