Cover image for The War of 1812 : a forgotten conflict
Title:
The War of 1812 : a forgotten conflict
Author:
Hickey, Donald R., 1944-
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Urbana : University of Illinois Press, [1989]

©1989
Physical Description:
xiii, 457 pages : maps, portraits ; 24 cm
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780252016134

9780252060595
Format :
Book

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E354 .H53 1989 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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E354 .H53 1989 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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E354 .H53 1989 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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E354 .H53 1989 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Summary

Summary

An in-depth examination of America's "Second War of Independence". The first comprehensive history to explore not just the military aspects but the economic and political dimensions in a single volume. With over 100 pages of notes. For students, historians, and general readers. Annotation(c) 2003 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)


Summary

History Book Club bestseller.Unabridged edition. "A penetrating analysis of prewar society. . . . Highly recommended as an inclusive political, military, and social treatment of a customarily neglected war." --ALA Booklist


Reviews 4

Booklist Review

Hickey provides a well-researched and extensively documented overview of the causes and consequences of the War of 1812. In a penetrating analysis of prewar society, the author accumulates evidence suggesting that the war was ultimately unnecessary and unpopular. Despite the fact that the military hostilities concluded in a draw and the Treaty of Ghent merely provided for a return to the status quo, the U.S. claimed victory and subsequently mythologized the inglorious conflict. Though no territory and few concessions were gained, the War of 1812 effectively splintered the Federalist party, destroyed the last viable native American confederation, and increased U.S. international stature. Highly recommended as an inclusive political, military, and social treatment of a customarily neglected war. Sources, notes; to be indexed. --Margaret Flanagan


Choice Review

Hickey's chronologically organized work adeptly presents both details and overviews of the War of 1812 in a very readable manner. He provides strategic and tactical details for military and political affairs, and reviews the domestic situation as well. There is a good summation of the political maneuvering leading up to the war and of the riots in Baltimore. A chapter on the Hartford Convention does much to clarify Federalist thinking during the war; a chapter on the treaty of Ghent is also very helpful. Hickey draws heavily from primary sources. His work suggests several starting points for additional research. He himself might have written more on British coastal raiding, especially in the southeast and New England. Also, some of Hickey's statements about interchangeable parts and musket caliber might alarm those with detailed knowledge about material culture. Nevertheless, a very useful work. Public and academic libraries. -L. E. Babits, Armstrong State College


Booklist Review

Hickey provides a well-researched and extensively documented overview of the causes and consequences of the War of 1812. In a penetrating analysis of prewar society, the author accumulates evidence suggesting that the war was ultimately unnecessary and unpopular. Despite the fact that the military hostilities concluded in a draw and the Treaty of Ghent merely provided for a return to the status quo, the U.S. claimed victory and subsequently mythologized the inglorious conflict. Though no territory and few concessions were gained, the War of 1812 effectively splintered the Federalist party, destroyed the last viable native American confederation, and increased U.S. international stature. Highly recommended as an inclusive political, military, and social treatment of a customarily neglected war. Sources, notes; to be indexed. --Margaret Flanagan


Choice Review

Hickey's chronologically organized work adeptly presents both details and overviews of the War of 1812 in a very readable manner. He provides strategic and tactical details for military and political affairs, and reviews the domestic situation as well. There is a good summation of the political maneuvering leading up to the war and of the riots in Baltimore. A chapter on the Hartford Convention does much to clarify Federalist thinking during the war; a chapter on the treaty of Ghent is also very helpful. Hickey draws heavily from primary sources. His work suggests several starting points for additional research. He himself might have written more on British coastal raiding, especially in the southeast and New England. Also, some of Hickey's statements about interchangeable parts and musket caliber might alarm those with detailed knowledge about material culture. Nevertheless, a very useful work. Public and academic libraries. -L. E. Babits, Armstrong State College