Cover image for The little lame prince
Title:
The little lame prince
Author:
Wells, Rosemary.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Dial Books for Young Readers, 1990.
Physical Description:
30 unnumbered pages : color illustrations ; 28 cm
Summary:
A young crippled prince must reclaim his kingdom from his evil uncle, with the help of a magic cape from his godmother.
General Note:
"Based on a story by Dinah Mulock Craik."
Language:
English
Genre:
ISBN:
9780803707887

9780803707894
Format :
Book

Available:*

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PZ8.W455 LI 1990 Juvenile Non-Fiction Fairy Tales
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Summary

Summary

A young crippled prince must reclaim his kingdom from his evil uncle, with the help of a magic cape from his godmother. This adaptation of the story uses animal characters.


Summary

A young crippled prince must reclaim his kingdom from his evil uncle, with the help of a magic cape from his godmother. This adaptation of the story uses animal characters.


Author Notes

Rosemary Wells was born in New York City on January 29, 1943. She studied at the Museum School in Boston. Without her degree, she left school at the age of 19 to get married. She began her career in publishing, working as an art editor and designer first at Allyn and Bacon and later at Macmillan Publishing.

She is an author and illustrator of over 60 books for children and young adults. Her first book was an illustrated edition of Gilbert and Sullivan's I Have a Song to Sing-O. Her other works include Martha's Birthday, The Fog Comes on Little Pig Feet, Unfortunately Harriet, Mary on Horseback, and Timothy Goes to School. She also created the characters of Max and Ruby, Noisy Nora, and Yoko, which are featured in some of her books. She has won numerous awards including a Children's Book Council Award for Noisy Nora in 1974, the Edgar Allan Poe award for two young adult books, Through the Looking Glass and When No One Was Looking, and the Boston Globe-Horn Book Award for Shy Charles.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Rosemary Wells was born in New York City on January 29, 1943. She studied at the Museum School in Boston. Without her degree, she left school at the age of 19 to get married. She began her career in publishing, working as an art editor and designer first at Allyn and Bacon and later at Macmillan Publishing.

She is an author and illustrator of over 60 books for children and young adults. Her first book was an illustrated edition of Gilbert and Sullivan's I Have a Song to Sing-O. Her other works include Martha's Birthday, The Fog Comes on Little Pig Feet, Unfortunately Harriet, Mary on Horseback, and Timothy Goes to School. She also created the characters of Max and Ruby, Noisy Nora, and Yoko, which are featured in some of her books. She has won numerous awards including a Children's Book Council Award for Noisy Nora in 1974, the Edgar Allan Poe award for two young adult books, Through the Looking Glass and When No One Was Looking, and the Boston Globe-Horn Book Award for Shy Charles.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 6

Booklist Review

Ages 3-7. Crippled at birth and orphaned at a tender age, Prince Francisco is banished to a desolate tower and the care of a kindly foster mother when his ambitious uncle seizes the throne. Aided by a fairy godmother and a magic cloud, the prince sets off to reclaim the throne. In adapting Dinah Mulock Craik's tale for a young audience, Wells uses a Spanish setting populated with her unique animal characters, which range here from the porcine royal family to kindly cow Carmen, Francisco's foster mother. The recognizable Wells style permeates illustrations that subtly reflect the correct palette, decorative details, and textures for the varied settings. Touches of humor are deftly woven in without sacrificing the mood: the godmother appears with the sound of popping corn, and evil uncle Osvaldo's demise is hastened by "the cigars, the brandy, the coffee, and the huge greasy meals." An excellent adaptation of a perennially pleasing tale. ~--Linda Callaghan


Publisher's Weekly Review

Although based on the Dinah Maria Mulock Craik novel, Wells's picture book retelling is devoid of the sentimental flavor of the original. The comic illustrations underscore the droll aspects of the text which, like the best of Ungerer or Steig, is filled with dry humor and delicious details. A vain chambermaid, more intent on fixing her eyelashes than minding the baby, drops Prince Francisco on the marble floor, causing his lameness. When his parents die soon after, his Uncle Osvaldo, a yellow-eyed porker who swills brandy and smokes cigars, shuts the prince in a tower and wreaks havoc on his peaceful kingdom. Eventually, Francisco's fairy godmother--``with limited powers''--sees to it that he is established as the rightful ruler of El Cordoba, where ``no one cares about your legs because your head is wise and your heart is kind.'' As winsome as Shy Charles and as ebullient as Max, Wells's gentle prince is a charmer. Ages 4-8. (Sept.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

Gr 1-3-- In side notes, Wells states that she hoped to adapt a favorite story of her childhood for younger children while keeping the spirit of the original. At this she is not successful. Craik's The Little Lame Prince more thoughtfully presents a coming-of-age story, a coming to grips with both good and evil in the world, and a realization of one's own strengths and weaknesses. Stripped of its action, this adaptation is more like Miss Piggy goes Anne of Green Gables. In fact, the main characters are pigs and the lady-in-waiting who drops the young prince causing his lameness is a silly goose. Taken on its own terms as a story, more parody than adaptation, it's a hoot. Wells' writing is fast paced and humorous, and she never talks down to her audience. Her good-natured illustrations are highly expressive and add additional humor to the tale. Younger children will indeed enjoy the adventure, while older children should definitely be directed to the original for its own special magic. --Judith Gloyer, Milwaukee Public Library (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Booklist Review

Ages 3-7. Crippled at birth and orphaned at a tender age, Prince Francisco is banished to a desolate tower and the care of a kindly foster mother when his ambitious uncle seizes the throne. Aided by a fairy godmother and a magic cloud, the prince sets off to reclaim the throne. In adapting Dinah Mulock Craik's tale for a young audience, Wells uses a Spanish setting populated with her unique animal characters, which range here from the porcine royal family to kindly cow Carmen, Francisco's foster mother. The recognizable Wells style permeates illustrations that subtly reflect the correct palette, decorative details, and textures for the varied settings. Touches of humor are deftly woven in without sacrificing the mood: the godmother appears with the sound of popping corn, and evil uncle Osvaldo's demise is hastened by "the cigars, the brandy, the coffee, and the huge greasy meals." An excellent adaptation of a perennially pleasing tale. ~--Linda Callaghan


Publisher's Weekly Review

Although based on the Dinah Maria Mulock Craik novel, Wells's picture book retelling is devoid of the sentimental flavor of the original. The comic illustrations underscore the droll aspects of the text which, like the best of Ungerer or Steig, is filled with dry humor and delicious details. A vain chambermaid, more intent on fixing her eyelashes than minding the baby, drops Prince Francisco on the marble floor, causing his lameness. When his parents die soon after, his Uncle Osvaldo, a yellow-eyed porker who swills brandy and smokes cigars, shuts the prince in a tower and wreaks havoc on his peaceful kingdom. Eventually, Francisco's fairy godmother--``with limited powers''--sees to it that he is established as the rightful ruler of El Cordoba, where ``no one cares about your legs because your head is wise and your heart is kind.'' As winsome as Shy Charles and as ebullient as Max, Wells's gentle prince is a charmer. Ages 4-8. (Sept.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

Gr 1-3-- In side notes, Wells states that she hoped to adapt a favorite story of her childhood for younger children while keeping the spirit of the original. At this she is not successful. Craik's The Little Lame Prince more thoughtfully presents a coming-of-age story, a coming to grips with both good and evil in the world, and a realization of one's own strengths and weaknesses. Stripped of its action, this adaptation is more like Miss Piggy goes Anne of Green Gables. In fact, the main characters are pigs and the lady-in-waiting who drops the young prince causing his lameness is a silly goose. Taken on its own terms as a story, more parody than adaptation, it's a hoot. Wells' writing is fast paced and humorous, and she never talks down to her audience. Her good-natured illustrations are highly expressive and add additional humor to the tale. Younger children will indeed enjoy the adventure, while older children should definitely be directed to the original for its own special magic. --Judith Gloyer, Milwaukee Public Library (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.