Cover image for The day the goose got loose
Title:
The day the goose got loose
Author:
Lindbergh, Reeve.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Dial Books for Young Readers, 1990.
Physical Description:
32 unnumbered pages : color illustrations ; 28 cm
Summary:
The day the goose gets loose, havoc reigns at the farm as all the animals react.
Language:
English
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 2.3 0.5 7555.
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780803704084

9780803704091
Format :
Book

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Central Library PIC BK. Juvenile Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Williamsville Library PIC.BK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Summary

Summary

The day the goose gets loose, havoc reigns at the farm as all the animals react.


Summary

The day the goose gets loose, havoc reigns at the farm as all the animals react.


Author Notes

Reeve Lindbergh is the youngest child of Charles and Anne Morrow Lindbergh, and the author of numerous books. She lives with her family near St. Johnsbury, Vermont.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reeve Lindbergh is the youngest child of Charles and Anne Morrow Lindbergh, and the author of numerous books. She lives with her family near St. Johnsbury, Vermont.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 6

Booklist Review

Ages 3-6. As the innocent agent of barnyard chaos, Jimmy's famous boa now has a serious rival. An insouciant goose unlocks her pen and ventures out to explore the farm; rhymed verses chronicle the disasters: "When the goose got loose / The cows were tense. / The goose provoked a bull named Spence. / He charged right through the pasture fence! / The day the goose got loose." Toward sunset, the tone shifts as the children discover that the bird escaped because it longs to follow the wild geese flying in formation overhead. Grandmother ruminates, "I wonder what thoughts went through her head," and one child falls asleep to dream of geese winging their way to a dream landscape, part fairytale, part peaceable kingdom. Both the poem and the artwork navigate the challenging shift from the ridiculous to the sublime with seemingly effortless grace. Kellogg, a master of comic mayhem, shows another side of his artistry in the dream sequence, depicting flight through overlapping images of geese, stars, and wings. The impressionistic watercolor paintings are shadowy, shot with golden light, and as ineffably joyous as the dream of freedom. As in Kellogg's earlier comic romps, the illustrations brim over with humorous bits, but here observant children can also find details foreshadowing the more serious theme expressed at the end. ~--Carolyn Phelan


Publisher's Weekly Review

What happens when the goose gets loose? She manages to throw the entire barnyard into chaos, and young readers will be tickled by the goings-on. After breaking out of her pen, the audacious creature eats the hens' grain; scares the sheep silly; causes the ram to butt a fussy-looking child, whose ``dress got messed and her hair un-styled''; sets free the horses, who storm the house; and provokes a bull named Spence to charge through the pasture fence. Lindbergh's rollicking rhymed verse charts the goose's destructive course, as Kellogg shows feathers and flowerpots flying, trashcans tumbling and wild-eyed people and animals scurrying in every direction. The goose calms down, finally, after the police arrive to set things right, and before long an explanation for her antics surfaces. The book closes with a soothing, exquisitely illustrated dream sequence that offsets the frenzy of the rest of the tale, and demonstrates Kellogg's remarkable versatility. Ages 4-8. (Sept.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

When the goose gets loose, the farm is in comical chaos. Each animal and person reacts in its own way, but only the younger brother knows why the goose got loose--because he saw the wild geese flying overhead. At night the boy dreams a wonderful dream about geese--tame and wild--with castles and wizards and other magical things. Like Lindbergh's The Midnight Farm (Dial, 1987), the satisfying rhyme and rhythm of this book make it a good choice for reading aloud. Both the story and illustrations are reminiscent of The Day Jimmy's Boa Ate the Wash (Dial, 1980), in which Noble's text and Kellogg's illustrations show the havoc caused by a pet snake let loose on a farm. The illustrations are typically Kellogg, rendered in pen and pencil with watercolor washes. The pages overflow with funny dramatic action. They are rich in detail and imagination, from the glowing orange panorama of the farm at dawn to the soft blue of the dream world at night. --Anne Price, Ann Mersereau School, Bronx, NY (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Booklist Review

Ages 3-6. As the innocent agent of barnyard chaos, Jimmy's famous boa now has a serious rival. An insouciant goose unlocks her pen and ventures out to explore the farm; rhymed verses chronicle the disasters: "When the goose got loose / The cows were tense. / The goose provoked a bull named Spence. / He charged right through the pasture fence! / The day the goose got loose." Toward sunset, the tone shifts as the children discover that the bird escaped because it longs to follow the wild geese flying in formation overhead. Grandmother ruminates, "I wonder what thoughts went through her head," and one child falls asleep to dream of geese winging their way to a dream landscape, part fairytale, part peaceable kingdom. Both the poem and the artwork navigate the challenging shift from the ridiculous to the sublime with seemingly effortless grace. Kellogg, a master of comic mayhem, shows another side of his artistry in the dream sequence, depicting flight through overlapping images of geese, stars, and wings. The impressionistic watercolor paintings are shadowy, shot with golden light, and as ineffably joyous as the dream of freedom. As in Kellogg's earlier comic romps, the illustrations brim over with humorous bits, but here observant children can also find details foreshadowing the more serious theme expressed at the end. ~--Carolyn Phelan


Publisher's Weekly Review

What happens when the goose gets loose? She manages to throw the entire barnyard into chaos, and young readers will be tickled by the goings-on. After breaking out of her pen, the audacious creature eats the hens' grain; scares the sheep silly; causes the ram to butt a fussy-looking child, whose ``dress got messed and her hair un-styled''; sets free the horses, who storm the house; and provokes a bull named Spence to charge through the pasture fence. Lindbergh's rollicking rhymed verse charts the goose's destructive course, as Kellogg shows feathers and flowerpots flying, trashcans tumbling and wild-eyed people and animals scurrying in every direction. The goose calms down, finally, after the police arrive to set things right, and before long an explanation for her antics surfaces. The book closes with a soothing, exquisitely illustrated dream sequence that offsets the frenzy of the rest of the tale, and demonstrates Kellogg's remarkable versatility. Ages 4-8. (Sept.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

When the goose gets loose, the farm is in comical chaos. Each animal and person reacts in its own way, but only the younger brother knows why the goose got loose--because he saw the wild geese flying overhead. At night the boy dreams a wonderful dream about geese--tame and wild--with castles and wizards and other magical things. Like Lindbergh's The Midnight Farm (Dial, 1987), the satisfying rhyme and rhythm of this book make it a good choice for reading aloud. Both the story and illustrations are reminiscent of The Day Jimmy's Boa Ate the Wash (Dial, 1980), in which Noble's text and Kellogg's illustrations show the havoc caused by a pet snake let loose on a farm. The illustrations are typically Kellogg, rendered in pen and pencil with watercolor washes. The pages overflow with funny dramatic action. They are rich in detail and imagination, from the glowing orange panorama of the farm at dawn to the soft blue of the dream world at night. --Anne Price, Ann Mersereau School, Bronx, NY (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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