Cover image for Natural wonders : stories science photos tell
Title:
Natural wonders : stories science photos tell
Author:
Cobb, Vicki.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Lothrop, Lee & Shepard, 1990.
Physical Description:
32 pages ; 23 cm
Summary:
Describes how to make photographs that reveal information about the apparent movement of the stars, the nature of the earth's crust, the interaction of roadrunners and rattlesnakes, and other scientific phenomena.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780688093174

9780688093181
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Grand Island Library TR692.5 .C63 1990 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Summary

Summary

Describes how to make photographs that reveal information about the apparent movement of the stars, the nature of the earth's crust, the interaction of roadrunners and rattlesnakes, and other scientific phenomena.


Summary

Describes how to make photographs that reveal information about the apparent movement of the stars, the nature of the earth's crust, the interaction of roadrunners and rattlesnakes, and other scientific phenomena.


Reviews 4

Booklist Review

Gr. 4-8. Scientific photographs are an important research tool. As this book makes clear, they are frequently objects of beauty and wonder as well. Cobb juxtaposes each large and striking photo with a lucid page of text explaining the scientific phenomenon the picture portrays and the techniques used in taking it. Subjects range from the familiar (a raindrop falling in a pond) to the intriguingly obscure (the analemma, or figure-eight pattern traced by the sun's shifting position over the course of a year). Other subjects include the crystalline structure of a diamond, the earth's atmosphere, protozoa in a drop of water, and an insect's view of a flower. Informative about both science and photography, this book is also fun to browse through. Index and glossary are included. ~--Leone McDermott


School Library Journal Review

Gr 3-6-- With this selection of 14 superb science photographs of remarkable quality and clarity, Cobb has captured some of the wonders of nature down to the smallest possible detail. Each photograph is explained through a well-written narrative and a description of how each photograph was made, whether with the use of special lighting, instruments, or timing devices. Special microscopes were used for viewing the minute detail of an insect's eye, for making a micrograph of a protozoan reproducing in pond water, while a falling drop of rain and a falling cat are both captured with the aid of a stroboscope. It's unfortunate that the faint gray san serif typeface may turn readers away from an otherwise fascinating introduction to science and photography. --Carolyn S. Brodie, Kent State University, OH (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Booklist Review

Gr. 4-8. Scientific photographs are an important research tool. As this book makes clear, they are frequently objects of beauty and wonder as well. Cobb juxtaposes each large and striking photo with a lucid page of text explaining the scientific phenomenon the picture portrays and the techniques used in taking it. Subjects range from the familiar (a raindrop falling in a pond) to the intriguingly obscure (the analemma, or figure-eight pattern traced by the sun's shifting position over the course of a year). Other subjects include the crystalline structure of a diamond, the earth's atmosphere, protozoa in a drop of water, and an insect's view of a flower. Informative about both science and photography, this book is also fun to browse through. Index and glossary are included. ~--Leone McDermott


School Library Journal Review

Gr 3-6-- With this selection of 14 superb science photographs of remarkable quality and clarity, Cobb has captured some of the wonders of nature down to the smallest possible detail. Each photograph is explained through a well-written narrative and a description of how each photograph was made, whether with the use of special lighting, instruments, or timing devices. Special microscopes were used for viewing the minute detail of an insect's eye, for making a micrograph of a protozoan reproducing in pond water, while a falling drop of rain and a falling cat are both captured with the aid of a stroboscope. It's unfortunate that the faint gray san serif typeface may turn readers away from an otherwise fascinating introduction to science and photography. --Carolyn S. Brodie, Kent State University, OH (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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