Cover image for Asian American literature : an annotated bibliography
Title:
Asian American literature : an annotated bibliography
Author:
Cheung, King-Kok, 1954-
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Modern Language Association of America, 1988.
Physical Description:
x, 276 pages ; 23 cm
General Note:
Includes indexes.
Language:
English
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780873529600

9780873529617
Format :
Book

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PS153.A84 C5 1988 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks-Non circulating
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Reviews 2

Choice Review

Academic libraries are being pulled in polar directions: toward acquiring resources to promote a Europe-centered ideal of cultural literacy while at the same time toward acquiring resources that reflect American ethnic and cultural diversity. Most US ethnic minorities, over the years, have received frequent, if scanty, attention. Cheung and Yogi now attempt to fill a large hole in Asian American research tools. Divided into two major sections (primary and secondary sources), each section is arranged by major ethnic group (Chinese, Japanese, Filipino, Korean, South Asian, and Vietnamese and Southeast Asian). With further subdivision into prose, poetry, and drama, the book is somewhat awkward to use. The four indexes (creative writers, secondary authors, reviewers, and editors, translators, illustrators) do little to alleviate the problem. Following Elaine Kim's call to be inclusive (in her Asian-American Literature, CH, Jan '83), Cheung and Yogi have chosen to be comprehensive rather than exclusive. They cover creative and critical literature written in or translated into English by and about Asian Americans, both US and Canadian. This leads to some interesting entries: for instance, Oba Minako and Kafu Nagai are certainly not Japanese Americans even though they spent parts of their careers in the US. Cheung and Yogi might better have included a chapter on Asian sojourners in North America to parallel the chapter on literature by non-Asians about Asians and Asian Americans. Many of the 183 indexed anthologies and most of the 65 journals will not be in most library collections. Most of the entries have not been listed previously in other bibliographies, except for infrequent duplication in the Bibliography of Asian Studies (under "Overseas Communities," by country). Except for the chapter on selected background sources, which is fine for monographs but less successful with periodical literature, this bibliography will make a useful addition to libraries seeking to provide access for students and scholars to the full cultural diversity of the US. M. K. Ewing St. Cloud State University


Choice Review

Academic libraries are being pulled in polar directions: toward acquiring resources to promote a Europe-centered ideal of cultural literacy while at the same time toward acquiring resources that reflect American ethnic and cultural diversity. Most US ethnic minorities, over the years, have received frequent, if scanty, attention. Cheung and Yogi now attempt to fill a large hole in Asian American research tools. Divided into two major sections (primary and secondary sources), each section is arranged by major ethnic group (Chinese, Japanese, Filipino, Korean, South Asian, and Vietnamese and Southeast Asian). With further subdivision into prose, poetry, and drama, the book is somewhat awkward to use. The four indexes (creative writers, secondary authors, reviewers, and editors, translators, illustrators) do little to alleviate the problem. Following Elaine Kim's call to be inclusive (in her Asian-American Literature, CH, Jan '83), Cheung and Yogi have chosen to be comprehensive rather than exclusive. They cover creative and critical literature written in or translated into English by and about Asian Americans, both US and Canadian. This leads to some interesting entries: for instance, Oba Minako and Kafu Nagai are certainly not Japanese Americans even though they spent parts of their careers in the US. Cheung and Yogi might better have included a chapter on Asian sojourners in North America to parallel the chapter on literature by non-Asians about Asians and Asian Americans. Many of the 183 indexed anthologies and most of the 65 journals will not be in most library collections. Most of the entries have not been listed previously in other bibliographies, except for infrequent duplication in the Bibliography of Asian Studies (under "Overseas Communities," by country). Except for the chapter on selected background sources, which is fine for monographs but less successful with periodical literature, this bibliography will make a useful addition to libraries seeking to provide access for students and scholars to the full cultural diversity of the US. M. K. Ewing St. Cloud State University