Cover image for That's Hollywood : a behind-the-scenes look at 60 of the greatest films ever made
Title:
That's Hollywood : a behind-the-scenes look at 60 of the greatest films ever made
Author:
Van Gelder, Peter, 1953-
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York, NY : HarperPerennial, [1990]

©1990
Physical Description:
288 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm
General Note:
Includes index.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780060551988

9780060965129
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library PN1998 .V3 1990 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks-Non circulating
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Central Library PN1998 .V3 1990 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Reviews 4

Booklist Review

The only problem with this terrific book is its title. It sounds too much like That's Entertainment or "Hooray for Hollywood" or the like. But this is no glossed-over, rose-tinted view of Tinseltown. What it is is a collection of general facts, fascinating tidbits, and humorous speculation about 60 excellent or very popular films, ranging from Frankenstein (1931) to Batman (1989). Van Gelder writes with wit throughout, describing, for each film, the principal players and production personnel (including ages at time of filming and career courses), the background on how the film got off the ground, the critical response, the behind-the-scenes politics and relationships, and the film's eccentricities, inaccuracies, or gaffes. The book's British origin probably explains Van Gelder's inclusion of films like Carry On Cleo (?) and The Dam Busters (??), which, like the several others that seem out of place, probably have wider recognition in jolly old England. No matter, American audiences will love this highly browsable item. ~--Martin Brady


Library Journal Review

Arranged alphabetically from Airplane! through The Wizard of Oz , this volume favors the commercial mainstream (other choices are Frankenstein and Batman ), sometimes to the point of quite dubious selections (e.g., Grease, The Exorcist ). Mercifully, the author forgoes plot synopses of the generally well-known movies, offering instead brief essays on how each film was made. The most interesting section is usually ``Can you spot . . . ?'' which notes such enjoyable minutiae as continuity lapses and technical tricks. A few Briticisms (Van Gelder is a BBC producer) will puzzle American readers, and there's not much new here for knowledgeable film buffs, but it's pleasant entertainment for general audiences.-- John Smothers, Monmouth Cty. Lib., Manalapan, N.J. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Booklist Review

The only problem with this terrific book is its title. It sounds too much like That's Entertainment or "Hooray for Hollywood" or the like. But this is no glossed-over, rose-tinted view of Tinseltown. What it is is a collection of general facts, fascinating tidbits, and humorous speculation about 60 excellent or very popular films, ranging from Frankenstein (1931) to Batman (1989). Van Gelder writes with wit throughout, describing, for each film, the principal players and production personnel (including ages at time of filming and career courses), the background on how the film got off the ground, the critical response, the behind-the-scenes politics and relationships, and the film's eccentricities, inaccuracies, or gaffes. The book's British origin probably explains Van Gelder's inclusion of films like Carry On Cleo (?) and The Dam Busters (??), which, like the several others that seem out of place, probably have wider recognition in jolly old England. No matter, American audiences will love this highly browsable item. ~--Martin Brady


Library Journal Review

Arranged alphabetically from Airplane! through The Wizard of Oz , this volume favors the commercial mainstream (other choices are Frankenstein and Batman ), sometimes to the point of quite dubious selections (e.g., Grease, The Exorcist ). Mercifully, the author forgoes plot synopses of the generally well-known movies, offering instead brief essays on how each film was made. The most interesting section is usually ``Can you spot . . . ?'' which notes such enjoyable minutiae as continuity lapses and technical tricks. A few Briticisms (Van Gelder is a BBC producer) will puzzle American readers, and there's not much new here for knowledgeable film buffs, but it's pleasant entertainment for general audiences.-- John Smothers, Monmouth Cty. Lib., Manalapan, N.J. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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