Cover image for Slow motion : changing masculinities, changing men
Title:
Slow motion : changing masculinities, changing men
Author:
Segal, Lynne.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New Brunswick, N.J. : Rutgers University Press, 1990.
Physical Description:
396 pages ; 20 cm
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780813516196

9780813516202
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library HQ1090 .S43 1990 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
Searching...

On Order

Summary

Summary

.


Summary

.


Author Notes

Lynn Segal was born in 1944 in Australia. She emigrated to London in 1970 and for the next decade her main energies went into grass roots politics in Islington, North London, helping to set up and run a women's centre and an alternative newspaper. In 1979, the three friends, Segal, Sheila Rowbotham and Hilary Wainwright wrote Beyond the Fragments, arguing for broader alliances among trade unionists, feminists and left political groups. In 1984, publisher Ursula Owen invited her to join the Virago Advisory Board and write an appraisal of the state of feminism, resulting in her first book, Is the Future Female? Troubled Thoughts on Contemporary Feminism. Her next book was Slow Motion: Changing Masculinities, Changing Men. In 2015 her title, Out Of Time: The Pleasures and Perils of Aging, made The New Zealand Best Seller List.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Lynn Segal was born in 1944 in Australia. She emigrated to London in 1970 and for the next decade her main energies went into grass roots politics in Islington, North London, helping to set up and run a women's centre and an alternative newspaper. In 1979, the three friends, Segal, Sheila Rowbotham and Hilary Wainwright wrote Beyond the Fragments, arguing for broader alliances among trade unionists, feminists and left political groups. In 1984, publisher Ursula Owen invited her to join the Virago Advisory Board and write an appraisal of the state of feminism, resulting in her first book, Is the Future Female? Troubled Thoughts on Contemporary Feminism. Her next book was Slow Motion: Changing Masculinities, Changing Men. In 2015 her title, Out Of Time: The Pleasures and Perils of Aging, made The New Zealand Best Seller List.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 6

Booklist Review

Segal follows her Marxist-feminist Is the Future Female? [BKL Ap 1 88] with another exceptionally well written, astute study, this time of mid- and late-twentieth-century "masculinities," as she calls the changing fashions of male consciousness. From the Angry Young Men (no women, she notes, needed to apply) of the 1950s to neo-macho gay men today, definitions of masculinity are more changeful than one might imagine. Few past masculinities, however, have been cognizant of women's needs, until the recent move toward co-parenting and shared housework. Segal points out that, in a mere 20 years of feminism, some men have made profound changes in their personal and daily lives and encourages more such joining of forces on the home front to achieve "the end of masculinity as we have known it." To be indexed. --Pat Monaghan


Publisher's Weekly Review

The title of this wide-ranging look at masculine identity refers to the pace at which men, according to the author, give up outdated notions of who they are. The white Western male enjoys (or suffers from) an identity that has taken centuries to perfect, and he is hanging on tenaciously. That's the bad news. The good news is that ``masculinity'' is not one but many things, the evolving product of contradictory social and historical forces. Segal, a British psychologist and feminist ( Is the Future Female?: Troubled Thoughts on Contemporary Feminism ), draws from a panoply of sources--novels, diaries, newspapers and feminist writings--for her portraits of modern men, from the Angry Young Man, the absent father and the rapist, to disenfranchised blacks and gays and antisexist men. Segal's critical approach is as varied as her subjects, commenting on a spectrum of psychoanalytic and feminist theories; in each case she concludes that theories don't work without an analysis of class, and that men as a class will not yield power until legislation compels them to. What's appealing about this study is that Segal accomplishes all of the above and writes persuasive, readable prose too. (Sept.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Choice Review

Segal presents a realistic analysis of the meanings of masculinity. The significant inclusion of men of color, as well as men from all economic, social, and political levels provides a carefully developed thesis on the differences among men and the continuing struggle for change. The extensive use of research references enhances the credibility of Segal's discourse on important issues effecting gender hierarchy. The final chapter clearly summarizes her proclivity toward social feminism and her interpretation of a new agenda for the 1990s. There is a formidable listing of notes and bibliography (61 pages), but it is difficult to assess the accuracy of all the data used throughout the book. (There is a glaring error, p.237, when Segal refers to the Arapesh as "American Indian" when, in fact, they are one of three groups studied by Margaret Mead in New Guinea.) It should be noted that James A. Doyle's The Male Experience (CH, Feb'84) and Jean Baker Miller's Toward a New Psychology of Women (2nd ed., CH, Jul'87) are two important sources that should be considered when analyzing male/female roles. The total content of the book poses questions and provocative ideas that make this a significant contribution to the ongoing discussion of the necessity for changes in the sexual agenda for the 1990s. Advanced undergraduates and up. G. M. Greenberg, emerita Western Michigan University


Booklist Review

Segal follows her Marxist-feminist Is the Future Female? [BKL Ap 1 88] with another exceptionally well written, astute study, this time of mid- and late-twentieth-century "masculinities," as she calls the changing fashions of male consciousness. From the Angry Young Men (no women, she notes, needed to apply) of the 1950s to neo-macho gay men today, definitions of masculinity are more changeful than one might imagine. Few past masculinities, however, have been cognizant of women's needs, until the recent move toward co-parenting and shared housework. Segal points out that, in a mere 20 years of feminism, some men have made profound changes in their personal and daily lives and encourages more such joining of forces on the home front to achieve "the end of masculinity as we have known it." To be indexed. --Pat Monaghan


Publisher's Weekly Review

The title of this wide-ranging look at masculine identity refers to the pace at which men, according to the author, give up outdated notions of who they are. The white Western male enjoys (or suffers from) an identity that has taken centuries to perfect, and he is hanging on tenaciously. That's the bad news. The good news is that ``masculinity'' is not one but many things, the evolving product of contradictory social and historical forces. Segal, a British psychologist and feminist ( Is the Future Female?: Troubled Thoughts on Contemporary Feminism ), draws from a panoply of sources--novels, diaries, newspapers and feminist writings--for her portraits of modern men, from the Angry Young Man, the absent father and the rapist, to disenfranchised blacks and gays and antisexist men. Segal's critical approach is as varied as her subjects, commenting on a spectrum of psychoanalytic and feminist theories; in each case she concludes that theories don't work without an analysis of class, and that men as a class will not yield power until legislation compels them to. What's appealing about this study is that Segal accomplishes all of the above and writes persuasive, readable prose too. (Sept.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Choice Review

Segal presents a realistic analysis of the meanings of masculinity. The significant inclusion of men of color, as well as men from all economic, social, and political levels provides a carefully developed thesis on the differences among men and the continuing struggle for change. The extensive use of research references enhances the credibility of Segal's discourse on important issues effecting gender hierarchy. The final chapter clearly summarizes her proclivity toward social feminism and her interpretation of a new agenda for the 1990s. There is a formidable listing of notes and bibliography (61 pages), but it is difficult to assess the accuracy of all the data used throughout the book. (There is a glaring error, p.237, when Segal refers to the Arapesh as "American Indian" when, in fact, they are one of three groups studied by Margaret Mead in New Guinea.) It should be noted that James A. Doyle's The Male Experience (CH, Feb'84) and Jean Baker Miller's Toward a New Psychology of Women (2nd ed., CH, Jul'87) are two important sources that should be considered when analyzing male/female roles. The total content of the book poses questions and provocative ideas that make this a significant contribution to the ongoing discussion of the necessity for changes in the sexual agenda for the 1990s. Advanced undergraduates and up. G. M. Greenberg, emerita Western Michigan University


Google Preview