Cover image for Smart like me : high school-age writing from the sixties to now
Title:
Smart like me : high school-age writing from the sixties to now
Author:
Lourie, Dick.
Publication Information:
Brooklyn, N.Y. : Hanging Loose Press, 1989.
Physical Description:
159 pages ; 23 cm
General Note:
Poems originally published in Hanging loose magazine, issues 1-50, 1966-1988.
Language:
English
Added Uniform Title:
Hanging loose.
ISBN:
9780914610595

9780914610588
Format :
Book

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PS591.H54 T94 1989 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Reviews 4

Booklist Review

``My mother's voice makes me cringe. / Everything is cement.'' This anthology of 148 poems by 50 high school students writing over the last 20 years has immediacy and candor about teenage experience. Originally published in Hanging Loose literary magazine, the selections range from Kai Peronard's ``Teenagerage'' to Sam Kashner's lyrical ``there was a time when / i would bend over backwards / for you / like an astronaut.'' The focus is personal; settings are largely urban; popular subjects are family, friendship, dreams, and awakening sexuality. The simple domestic pleasure of Katy Akin's ``Cake Poem'' (``I feel good about cooking'') is placed alongside poems expressing childish sibling rivalry and depression about abortion and mental illness. Many pieces lack a controlling form, but there's little pretentiousness. Together with some of the excellent YA anthologies of contemporary adult poetry, such as Paul Janeczko's Poetspeak [BKL Jl 83], the presentation will encourage teen writers. It will also help break the stereotype of poetry as something esoteric and removed from ordinary life. Gr. 9-12. HR.


School Library Journal Review

Gr 8 Up These are not poems by adults written from a teen perspective as in Mel Glenn's Class Dismissed! (Clarion, 1982). These poems are by teenagers themselves, expressing an incredible range of thought and feeling on a wide variety of topics. The 148 poems are taken from the first 50 issues of Hanging Loose magazine. Most are written in free verse, and readers need a basic understanding of this style to appreciate the book. The writing spans 20 years, but surprisingly few references date them. The levels of insight and maturity are often astounding. Stark images abound: Joanne Avallon's ``Daughter'' begins, ``There is nothing to be said/ for a daughter who comes/ home at night with poems/ on her breath.'' Penelope Jane Reid's ``Smart Like Me'' is a brief yet potent vision of a 16 year old who has just had an abortion. ``Spring Cleaning'' is Tammy Boyer's lament for her finished childhood as she accepts adolescence. The language is open, honest, frank, and sometimes pleasantly bewildering, fitting each poem's particular depth and impact. Many are about parents, grandparents, siblings, friends, romantic relationships, and other subjects of concern to teens. Some are quite philosophical. A biographical section on the poets is included at the end. A fine choice for readers who enjoy complex, interesting poetry that makes them think. Diane P. Tuccillo, Mesa Public Library, Ariz. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Booklist Review

``My mother's voice makes me cringe. / Everything is cement.'' This anthology of 148 poems by 50 high school students writing over the last 20 years has immediacy and candor about teenage experience. Originally published in Hanging Loose literary magazine, the selections range from Kai Peronard's ``Teenagerage'' to Sam Kashner's lyrical ``there was a time when / i would bend over backwards / for you / like an astronaut.'' The focus is personal; settings are largely urban; popular subjects are family, friendship, dreams, and awakening sexuality. The simple domestic pleasure of Katy Akin's ``Cake Poem'' (``I feel good about cooking'') is placed alongside poems expressing childish sibling rivalry and depression about abortion and mental illness. Many pieces lack a controlling form, but there's little pretentiousness. Together with some of the excellent YA anthologies of contemporary adult poetry, such as Paul Janeczko's Poetspeak [BKL Jl 83], the presentation will encourage teen writers. It will also help break the stereotype of poetry as something esoteric and removed from ordinary life. Gr. 9-12. HR.


School Library Journal Review

Gr 8 Up These are not poems by adults written from a teen perspective as in Mel Glenn's Class Dismissed! (Clarion, 1982). These poems are by teenagers themselves, expressing an incredible range of thought and feeling on a wide variety of topics. The 148 poems are taken from the first 50 issues of Hanging Loose magazine. Most are written in free verse, and readers need a basic understanding of this style to appreciate the book. The writing spans 20 years, but surprisingly few references date them. The levels of insight and maturity are often astounding. Stark images abound: Joanne Avallon's ``Daughter'' begins, ``There is nothing to be said/ for a daughter who comes/ home at night with poems/ on her breath.'' Penelope Jane Reid's ``Smart Like Me'' is a brief yet potent vision of a 16 year old who has just had an abortion. ``Spring Cleaning'' is Tammy Boyer's lament for her finished childhood as she accepts adolescence. The language is open, honest, frank, and sometimes pleasantly bewildering, fitting each poem's particular depth and impact. Many are about parents, grandparents, siblings, friends, romantic relationships, and other subjects of concern to teens. Some are quite philosophical. A biographical section on the poets is included at the end. A fine choice for readers who enjoy complex, interesting poetry that makes them think. Diane P. Tuccillo, Mesa Public Library, Ariz. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.